Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Catalogue Number
1387.3 - Queensland in Review, 2003  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 12/11/2003  Ceased
   Page tools: Print Print Page RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product  
Contents >> Social Characteristics of Population >> Managing Caring Responsibilities and Paid Employment, Queensland, October 2002

INTRODUCTION

Many Queenslanders are faced with the need to balance a job and caring for another person, such as a child or an ill or elderly relative. Some employees have access to flexible working hours, some work part-time and others work from home. In some cases, employees may have to use paid or unpaid leave.

Having caring responsibilities can impact on employees' working arrangements, can influence whether they change jobs or seek promotion, or even change the total number of hours they are available for work.

This article presents information on the labour force experience of those who had caring responsibilities in the six months ending October 2002. The focus is on the use of leave and flexible work arrangements and whether caring responsibilities have an impact on employment. Further information is available in the ABS publication Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities, Queensland, October 2002 (cat. no. 4903.3).

For the purposes of this survey a carer was defined as any person in Queensland aged 18 years or over who, in the six months to October 2002, had a child under 15 years of age, as well as anyone who cared for someone else where this care was not done as part of paid work.

Topics covered include:

CARERS IN QUEENSLAND
EMPLOYEES AND CARING
MATERNITY LEAVE


CARERS IN QUEENSLAND

In the six months to October 2002, an estimated 1,068,300 or 47.1% of persons aged 18 years and over in Queensland provided unpaid care for another adult or child. More than half of all females provided care (52.8%), while 41.4% of males provided care. Table 1 shows the population breakdown of care providers and the frequency with which the care was provided.

Of the total care provided, the majority (68.6%) was on an ongoing or continual basis. Occasional care was provided in just over a quarter of all cases (26.3%) and once only care was used in only 5.1% of cases.



1. PERSONS, WHETHER PROVIDED CARE(a)


Males


Females


Persons

Whether provided care

'000

%


'000

%


'000

%



Persons who provided care

465.5

41.4


602.8

52.8


1,068.3

47.1

Persons who did not provide care

658.3

58.6


539.5

47.2


1,197.8

52.9

Total persons(b)

1,123.8

100.0


1,142.3

100.0


2,266.1

100.0

Provided care(c)










Once only

24.5

4.8


37.4

5.3


61.9

5.1


Occasionally

112.8

22.3


205.7

29.2


318.5

26.3


Ongoing or continual(d)

369.2

72.9


460.2

65.4


829.4

68.6


Total responses

506.5

100.0


703.3

100.0


1,209.8

100.0



(a) In the 6 months to October 2002.
(b) Aged 18 years and over.
(c) One person may provide more than one type of care.
(d) Persons with children under 15 were classified as providing care on an ongoing or continual basis.

Source: Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities, Queensland, October 2002 (cat. no. 4903.3).

Type of Care Provided

As shown in Table 2, of the care provided, 20.7% was for children aged under six and 20.2% for children aged 6 years to under 15. Elderly persons received 9.4% of the total care with a further 13.4% provided to any other person (including family members). A significant amount (36.3%) of all care was concerned with persons caring for their own children only.


2. TYPE OF CARE PROVIDED
Males
Females
Persons
Care provided for
'000
%
'000
%
'000
%

Child aged under 6 years
88.1
16.2
188.2
23.9
276.3
20.7
Child aged 6 years to under 15
93.5
17.2
176.0
22.3
269.6
20.2
Elderly person
43.6
8.0
81.9
10.4
125.5
9.4
Any other person (including family members)
63.1
11.6
114.7
14.5
177.8
13.4
Own children only
255.3
47.0
227.6
28.9
482.9
36.3

Total(a)

543.6

100.0

788.4

100.0

1,332.0

100.0

(a) Figures do not reflect actual persons, as carers could have provided more than one type of care with the exception of own children only.

Source: Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities, Queensland, October 2002 (cat. no. 4903.3).

Back to top


EMPLOYEES AND CARING

Whether Working Arrangements Used for Caring

3. CARERS BY EMPLOYMENT STATUS
GRAPH -  CARERS BY EMPLOYMENT STATUS
(a) Other employment includes other categories of employment such as employers, own account workers, etc.

Source: Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities, Queensland, October 2002 (cat. no. 4903.3).

Graph 3 shows the percentage breakdown by employment status of the estimated 1,068,300 people who provided care in the 6 months ended 2002. Nearly half of all carers (an estimated 518,700 persons) were employees in paid employment, with 73.8% of these permanent employees and 26.2% casual. Of the carers who were also employees, 36.4% had used some form of working arrangement in the last six months to help care for another person. This varied by sex and sector of employment.

Females were more likely to use work arrangements (42.0%) than males (31.2%). However, the difference between females and males appears to be significant in the private sector rather than the government or public service sector. In the private sector, 39.1% of females used work arrangements to care for another person compared to 27.5% of males. In the government or public service sector similar proportions of females and males used working arrangements to care (47.6% and 44.0%, respectively).

Type of Working Arrangements Used for Caring

Taking paid leave (45.8%) was the most common working arrangement used to care for another person, followed by using flex-time, rostered day off, or time in lieu (39.2%), informal arrangements with employer (27.3%), temporarily reducing hours of work (16.1%), working from home (15.9%) and unpaid leave (15.7%).

Graph 4 shows the variations in the type of arrangements used by males and females. Males were more likely than females to use paid leave (52.7% compared to 40.6%), while females were more likely than males to use temporarily reduced hours (21.2% compared to 9.5%) and unpaid leave (20.8% compared to 9.1%).

4. WORKING ARRANGEMENTS(a) USED TO CARE BY SEX - 2002

GRAPH -  WORKING ARRANGEMENTS(a) USED TO CARE BY SEX - 2002
(a) Carers could have used more than one type of working arrangement.

Source: Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities, Queensland, October 2002 (cat. no. 4903.3).

Whether Wanted to Make More Use of Working Arrangements for Caring

Of those carers who were employees in paid employment, an estimated 68,700 (13.2%) wanted to make more use of some form of working arrangement to care for another person. This varied by sex and sector of employment.

A higher proportion of females than males in the government and public service sector wanted to make more use of working arrangements (20.9% compared to 12.6%). Females in the government and public service sector also wanted to make more use of working arrangements than females in the private sector (20.9% compared to 13.7%).

Working Arrangements Wanted

The types of working arrangements people wanted to make more use of included flex-time, rostered day off, or time in lieu (46.4%), paid leave (33.1%) and working from home (17.7%). The main reasons for not making more use of working arrangements were lack of adequate working arrangements (41.6%) and work commitments (25.6%).

Impact on Employment

In the six months to October 2002, an estimated 39,500 or 7.6% of carers who are employees made a change in employment in order to care for someone. Of these changed arrangements, 4.3% permanently changed usual start time or finish times, 3.2% permanently reduced the number of hours and 1.3% changed jobs.

On the other hand, an estimated 32,700 or 6.3% of carers who are employees were unable to make a change in employment because of their caring responsibilities. Of the changes wanted, 3.6% were unable to change the total number of hours worked, 2.4% were unable to change jobs and 2.0% were unable to apply for a promotion.

Back to top


MATERNITY LEAVE

In October 2002, there were an estimated 48,700 women, who were employees, aged 18–54 with a child under the age of six who had taken some form of maternity leave in the last five years. As shown in Table 5, of these, 24,500 (50.3%) had taken a mix of paid and unpaid leave during their most recent pregnancy and 17,700 (36.3%) had taken unpaid leave, with 66.0% of the women taking more than 26 weeks leave.


5. WOMEN(a) WHO TOOK MATERNITY LEAVE (b)(c), WHETHER THEY TOOK PAID AND UNPAID LEAVE
0-26 weeks
More than 26 weeks
Total
Weeks of paid leave
'000
'000
'000

Taken a mix of paid leave types
*2.5
*1.3
*3.8
Taken paid maternity leave only
*2.2
**0.5
*2.7
Taken a mix of paid and unpaid leave
6.1
18.4
24.5
Taken unpaid leave
5.8
11.9
17.7

Total

16.6

32.1

48.7

(a) Aged 18-54 with a child under the age of six.
(b) The most recent maternity leave taken in the last five years.
(c) All categories are mutually exclusive.

* Estimate has a relative standard error of between 25% and 50% and should be used with caution.
** Estimate had a relative standard error greater than 50% and is subject to sampling variability too high for most practical purposes.

Source: Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities, Queensland, October 2002 (cat. no. 4903.3).

Of women who had taken maternity leave in the last five years, 67.6% had returned to work by October 2002, 17.2% did not return to work and 15.2% were still on maternity leave. Of women who returned to work, 43.2% were in exactly the same job with the same employer, 43.6% were in the same job with the same employer but with reduced hours, 2.5% with the same employer but in a different job and 6.9% with a different employer.

Back to top

Previous PageNext Page

Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window


Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.