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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011-12 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/04/2013   
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MEDIA RELEASE
30 April 2013
Embargo: 11.30 am (Canberra time)
68/2013

INNER SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA’S MOST DENSELY POPULATED

The four most densely populated areas in the country all surround Sydney's central business district, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

ABS Director of Demography, Bjorn Jarvis, said the four locations with the highest population density in Australia were:
    Pyrmont – Ultimo;
    Potts Point – Woolloomooloo;
    Darlinghurst; and
    Surry Hills.
    “Each of these areas has a population density of over 13,000 residents per square kilometre,” Mr Jarvis said.

    “Inner-city Melbourne had the next highest density, at 10,100 people per square kilometre.

    “Inner Melbourne also had the country's largest increase in density in 2011-12, adding an extra 860 people per square kilometre over the year,” he said.

    Outside the inner cities, newly established suburbs also had large increases in population density.

    Population density in Bonner, on the northern fringes of Canberra, virtually doubled from 620 to 1,200 people per square kilometre. Forde and Crace, up 480 and 450 people per square kilometre respectively, also had large increases.


    New South Wales

    Population growth in Sydney accounted for more than three-quarters of the state's total growth. Parklea - Kellyville Ridge, in Sydney's north-west growth corridor, had both the largest and fastest growth in the state (up 2,300 people or 10 per cent).

    Victoria

    Melbourne had the largest growth of all capital cities in Australia, up 77,200 people. The areas with the largest population increases in the country were all on the outskirts of Melbourne. They were South Morang and Craigieburn - Mickleham in the north, and Point Cook and Tarneit in the west, which grew by a combined 16,500 people in just one year.

    Queensland

    Growth in Brisbane (43,300 people) was almost matched by growth in the rest of the state (42,700). Outside of capital cities, the areas with the highest population densities in Australia were on Queensland's Gold Coast including Mermaid Beach - Broadbeach and Surfers Paradise (both 3,700 people per square kilometre).

    South Australia

    Davoren Park in Adelaide's north had the largest population growth in the state, up 710 people, while neighbouring Munno Para West - Angle Vale had the fastest growth, increasing by 8.3 per cent.

    Western Australia

    Perth was the fastest-growing of all capital cities, up 3.6 per cent. Forrestdale - Harrisdale - Piara Waters in Perth's south-east was the fastest growing area in the state, increasing by 24 per cent to reach 9,600 people.

    Tasmania

    Hobart grew by 680 people, while the remainder of Tasmania increased by just 140 people. The areas with the fastest growth were Latrobe (up 2.8 per cent) in the state's north, and Margate - Snug (2.7 per cent) in Hobart's south.

    Northern Territory

    The Darwin suburbs of Rosebery - Bellamack (up 10 per cent) and Lyons (6 per cent), were the fastest-growing areas in the NT. Rosebery - Bellamack also had the largest growth (up 380 people), followed by Katherine (260) in the Lower Top End.

    Australian Capital Territory

    The population of the northern regions increased by 7,500 people, while the south decreased by 630. The northern region of Gungahlin contributed the most to this growth, increasing by 5,100 people.

    Media notes:
    1) When reporting ABS data you must attribute the Australian Bureau of Statistics (or the ABS) as the source.
    2) Unless otherwise stated, areas mentioned in this release are defined as Statistical Areas Level 2 (SA2s), regions as Statistical Areas Level 3 (SA3s) and capital cities as Greater Capital City Statistical Areas.
    3) Fastest growth rankings exclude areas with less than 1,000 people at June 2011.


    Regional population growth 2011-12, summary statistics

    Estimated resident population
    Change 2011-12
    2011
    2012
    Population increase
    Percentage increase

    TOTAL AUSTRALIA (a)
    22323933
    22683573
    359640
    1.6
    Capital Cities
    14729816
    15001523
    271707
    1.8
    Remainder
    7594117
    7682050
    87933
    1.2
    Estimated resident population
    Change 2011-12
    GCCSA name
    2011
    2012
    Population increase
    Percentage increase
    Greater Sydney
    4605992
    4667283
    61291
    1.3%
    Rest of NSW
    2605476
    2623062
    17586
    0.7%

    Greater Melbourne
    4169103
    4246345
    77242
    1.9%
    Rest of Vic.
    1365423
    1377147
    11724
    0.9%

    Greater Brisbane
    2146577
    2189878
    43301
    2.0%
    Rest of Qld
    2327521
    2370181
    42660
    1.8%

    Greater Adelaide
    1262940
    1277174
    14234
    1.1%
    Rest of SA
    375292
    377604
    2312
    0.6%

    Greater Perth
    1832114
    1897548
    65434
    3.6%
    Rest of WA
    520101
    532704
    12603
    2.4%

    Greater Hobart
    216276
    216959
    683
    0.3%
    Rest of Tas.
    294919
    295060
    141
    0.0%

    Greater Darwin
    129062
    131678
    2616
    2.0%
    Rest of NT
    102269
    103158
    889
    0.9%

    Australian Capital Territory
    367752
    374658
    6906
    1.9%

    (a) Includes Other Territories.





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