Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Catalogue Number
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
3235.0 - Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 28/08/2014   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product
MEDIA RELEASE
28 August 2014
Embargo: 11:30 am (Canberra Time)
125/2014
Melbourne outpaces Sydney, Darwin has a youthful glow and NSW's aged are coasting to retirement

The latest regional population numbers from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) show just how much variety and contrast there is across our nation.

"Our latest figures for the age and sex of people all around Australia make for some interesting reading," said Denise Carlton from the ABS.

"The median age of areas in Australia ranges from a low of 22.5 years in Yarrabah in Queensland's Far North, to a high of 60.0 years in Tea Gardens - Hawks Nest on the NSW coast.

"Men outnumber women the most in WA's East Pilbara, where there are 338 males for every 100 females.

"In contrast, Deakin in the ACT had just 82 males for every 100 females, the lowest ratio in Australia."

For more highlights in each state and territory, read on...

New South Wales - The residents of Tea Gardens – Hawks Nest near Port Stephens on the New South Wales coast, are officially Australia’s oldest, with a median age of 60.0 years. This compares with 37.8 years for NSW and 37.3 for Australia.

Read more at: NSW's aged are coasting to retirement.

Victoria - Melbourne's population growth rate between 2008 and 2013 has again exceeded Sydney's. Not only did Melbourne grow faster - at 11 per cent compared to 8 per cent for Sydney - but it also experienced a larger increase in population (416,500 compared to 347,500).

Read more at: Melbourne's population still kicking goals.

Queensland - Yarrabah, an Aboriginal community in Queensland’s Far North, has Australia’s youngest population, with a median age of just 22.5 years, compared with 37.3 for the Australian population.

Read more at: Queensland dominates youth league tables.

South Australia - Adelaide's kid population is growing slower than any other mainland capital city. Over the last five years, the number of people under 15 years went up by only 4.7 per cent, compared to 16 per cent in Perth, 9.8 per cent in Brisbane and 9.6 per cent in Canberra.

Read more at: Growth in Adelaide's population of children taking baby steps.

Western Australia - Perth has retained its position as the fastest growing capital city in Australia. Outstripping all other capitals, Perth grew 17 per cent between 2008 and 2013, ahead of Darwin (12 per cent) and Brisbane (11 per cent).

Read more at: How the West was 1.

Tasmania - Hobart has the oldest population of any Australian capital city. With a median age of 39.4 years, it's just ahead of the next oldest capital, Adelaide at 38.8 years.

Read more at: The aged at the core of the Apple Isle.

Northern Territory - Darwin has retained its mantle as Australia’s youngest capital with a median age of just 33.0 years, compared to 34.6 years for nearest rival Canberra.

Read more at: Territorians at Top End of youth numbers.

Australian Capital Territory - Population growth in the ACT topped nine per cent over the past five years thanks largely to new suburbs. Bonner, Casey and Crace alone added more than 8,500 people to the ACT's population since 2008, with most of this growth in children and the working age population.

Read more at: Population growth is familiar territory for Australia's capital.


Media notes:

  • Unless otherwise stated, areas mentioned in this release are Statistical Areas Level 2 and capital cities are Greater Capital City Statistical Areas, as defined in the Australia Statistical Geography Standard.
  • When reporting ABS data you must attribute the Australian Bureau of Statistics (or the ABS) as the source.
  • Media requests and interviews - contact the ABS Communications Section on 1300 175 070.

NSW's aged are coasting to retirement

The residents of Tea Gardens – Hawks Nest, near Port Stephens on the New South Wales coast, are officially Australia’s oldest, according to estimates released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

In June 2013, the median age of people living in Tea Gardens – Hawks Nest was 60.0 years, compared with 37.8 for NSW and 37.3 for Australia.

It was one of three NSW coastal areas to top the table of Australia’s most aged populations.

The Mid North Coast area of Tuncurry had the highest proportion of people aged 65 years and over in Australia (40%), followed by Tea Gardens – Hawks Nest (also 40%) and Sussex Inlet – Berrara (38%), on the state’s south coast.

“The older population in these areas, and others such as Bowral (31%) in the Southern Highlands, reflects a preference among many older Australians to retire to coastal and rural parts of the state”, said ABS Director of Demography, Denise Carlton.

Whilst almost two-thirds (64%) of the NSW population lived in Sydney in 2013, only 56% of people aged 65 years and over resided there.

Among all states and territories, NSW had the third oldest population. In 2013, 15% of the state’s population were 65 years of age or older, behind Tasmania (17.3%) and South Australia (16.7%).

For further information, see Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3235.0).

Australia's most aged populations, June 2013
Area
State/Territory
% Population aged 65 years and over
1Tuncurry
NSW
40.5
2Tea Gardens - Hawks Nest
NSW
39.9
3Sussex Inlet - Berrara
NSW
37.9
4Bribie Island
Qld
37.1
5Victor Harbor
SA
36.8

Melbourne's population still kicking goals

Melbourne’s population growth continues to outstrip that of Sydney, according to estimates released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Not only did Melbourne grow at a faster rate between 2008 and 2013 (11% compared with 8%), but it also experienced a larger increase in population (416,500 compared with 347,500).

“Melbourne’s growth since 2008 exceeded that of Sydney across all major age groups, including children under 15 years (9.0% compared with 6.8%) and the working age population (9.7% compared with 6.5%)”, said ABS Director of Demography, Denise Carlton.

Victoria’s population grew by 483,000 people, or 9.2%, between 2008 and 2013, the fifth fastest growth of all states and territories, behind WA (16%), Queensland (10%), NT and ACT (both 9.5%).

The vast majority of this growth (86%) can be attributed to Melbourne's increased population.

Whilst the median age of Victorians in 2013 was the same as that of Australia (37.3 years), a number of areas within the state were among the nation’s oldest. They included the coastal areas of Paynesville, with a median age of 57.8 years, Queenscliff (55.4) and Portarlington (54.9).

These areas also had high proportions of people aged 65 years and over, and low proportions of working age people (15 to 64 year olds).

The coastal areas of Paynesville (36%), Queenscliff (34%) and Rosebud - McCrae (32%) had the highest proportions of aged residents in the state.

Around 77% of Victorians of working age lived in Melbourne. The proportions of people aged 15 to 64 years were highest in inner-city Melbourne (94%), Southbank (90%), Docklands (88%) and Carlton (88%), reflecting the high number of students and professionals living in these areas.

For further information, see Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3235.0).

A Tale of Two Cities
Melbourne
Sydney
Population, 2013
4.35 million
4.76 million
Population increase, 2008-13
416,500
347,500
Population growth, 2008-13
10.6%
7.9%
Growth in 0-14 year olds, 2008-13
9.0%
6.8%
Growth in 15-64 year olds, 2008-13
9.7%
6.5%
Growth in 65+ year olds, 2008-13
17.9%
17.2%
Median age
36.1
36.1


Queensland dominates youth league tables

Yarrabah, an Aboriginal community in Queensland’s Far North, has Australia’s youngest population, according to estimates released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

In June 2013, the median age of people living in Yarrabah was 22.5 years, compared with 37.3 for the Australian population.

“Yarrabah was one of five areas in Queensland to rank among Australia’s ten youngest populations”, said ABS Director of Demography, Denise Carlton.

Three of these areas – Yarrabah, Northern Peninsula (median age 23.6 years) and Torres Strait Islands (24.5) – had predominantly Indigenous populations.

The other areas - St Lucia (24.3), an inner suburb of Brisbane and home of the University of Queensland, and Douglas (24.4), a suburb of Townsville which includes James Cook University – had high numbers of residents who were tertiary students.

In 2013, the largest proportions of working age Queenslanders – people aged between 15 and 64 years – resided in the inner Brisbane areas of Fortitude Valley (91%), Brisbane City (89%) and Spring Hill (87%).

Bribie Island had the state’s largest proportion of people aged 65 years and over (37%), and the highest median age in Queensland (58.1 years).

Overall, Queensland’s population grew by 10% between 2008 and 2013, the second fastest growth of all states and territories, behind Western Australia at 16%.

For further information, see Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3235.0).

Australia's youngest populations, 2013
Area
State/Territory
Median Age
1Yarrabah
Qld
22.5
2Thamarrurr
NT
22.6
3Acton
ACT
22.8
4Northern Peninsula
Qld
23.6
5St Lucia
Qld
24.3
6Douglas
Qld
24.4
7Torres Strait Islands
Qld
24.5
8Parkville
Vic
24.9
9West Arnhem
NT
24.9
10Civic
ACT
24.9

Growth in Adelaide's population of children taking baby steps

The population of children in Adelaide is growing at a slower rate than any other mainland capital city, according to estimates released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Between 2008 and 2013, the number of people under 15 years of age increased by 4.7% in Adelaide. This compared with 16% in Perth, 9.8% in Brisbane, 9.6% in Canberra, 9.0% in Melbourne, 6.8% in Sydney, 5.6% in Darwin and 2.1% in Hobart.

In 2013, people under 15 years of age made up less than 18% of Adelaide’s population, the lowest proportion of all capital cities.

"In the past five years, population growth across all major age groups – for children, among people of working age (15 to 64 years) and in the aged population - was slower in Adelaide than in almost all other capital cities", said ABS Director of Demography, Denise Carlton.

Between 2008 and 2013, Adelaide’s total population increased by 72,100 people (or 5.9%). Only Hobart grew at a slower rate (4.2%).

South Australia has one of the oldest populations in Australia. In 2013, the median age of SA residents was 39.8 years. This was the second highest of all states and territories, behind Tasmania (41.2 years).

The proportion of South Australians aged 65 years and over (16.7%) is second only to Tasmania (17.3%). Victor Harbor (37%) and Goolwa - Port Elliot (35%), on the Fleurieu Peninsula, had the highest proportions of people aged 65 and over in the state, and were among the highest in Australia.

For further information, see Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3235.0).


Where the Aged Are:
Proportion of Population Aged 65 Years and Over,
Top 5 Areas in SA, 2013
Area
% population aged
65 years and over
1Victor Harbor
36.8
2Goolwa - Pt Elliot
34.8
3Yorke Peninsula - South
30.9
4Moonta
29.9
5Yorke Peninsula - North
28.6

How the West was 1

Perth has retained its position as the fastest growing capital city in Australia, according to estimates released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Not only did Perth’s overall population growth outstrip that of other capitals – growing by 17% between 2008 and 2013, ahead of Darwin (12%) – but it also had the fastest growth among children under 15 years and the working age population.

“The number of children under 15 years of age increased by 16% in Perth between 2008 and 2013, compared with 9.8% in Brisbane and 9.6% in Canberra”, said ABS Director of Demography, Denise Carlton.

The working age population (aged 15 to 64 years) in Perth increased by 17% over this period, compared with 12% in Darwin and 10% in Brisbane.

The mining region of East Pilbara had the highest proportion of working age population in Western Australia (90% in 2013). It also had the highest sex ratio in Australia, with 337.5 males per 100 females.

Seven of the ten areas with the highest sex ratios in Australia were located in WA. These included the mining areas of Roebourne (224.6) and Ashburton (216.0).

The median age of Perth's population was 35.5 years in 2013, down from 36.3 in 2008 – the only capital city to record a decline in its median age during this period.

For further information, see Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3235.0).

Australia's Top Blokes: The 10 Highest Sex Ratios in Australia, 2013
Area
State/Territory
Males per 100 females
1East Pilbara
WA
337.5
2Berrimah
NT
225.8
3Roebourne
WA
224.6
4Ashburton
WA
216.0
5Casuarina - Wellard (East)
WA
215.4
6Wacol
Qld
199.1
7Chidlow
WA
190.9
8Meekatharra
WA
183.0
9Leinster - Leonora
WA
176.2
10Outback
SA
174.7

The aged at the core of the Apple Isle

Hobart has the oldest population of any Australian capital city, according to estimates released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Hobart’s median age was 39.4 years at June 2013, just ahead of the next oldest capital, Adelaide (38.8).

The median age of Hobart's population increased by 1.1 years between 2008 and 2013, the largest increase recorded by any capital city in Australia.

“Hobart also had the highest proportion of people aged 65 years and over in 2013 (16.1%), just ahead of Adelaide (16.0%)”, said ABS Director of Demography, Denise Carlton.

In 2013, Triabunna – Bicheno, on Tasmania’s east coast, had the state’s highest proportion of people aged 65 years or over (28%) and also the highest median age (54.2 years).

Tasmania had the lowest proportion of working age population (aged 15 to 64 years) in Australia (64% in 2013).

It was also the only state or territory to experience a decline in the number of children between 2008 and 2013. Over this period, the number of people under 15 years of age fell by 1.7%, from 96,800 in 2008 to 95,100 in 2013.

For further information, see Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3235.0).

Tasmania's Top 5 aged populations, 2013
Area
% population aged 65 years and over
Median age
1Triabunna - Bicheno
28.4
54.2
2Forestier - Tasman
25.3
52.3
3Norwood
24.8
48.0
4St Helens - Scamander
24.6
51.1
5Bellerive - Rosny
24.2
47.1

Territorians at Top End of youth numbers

Darwin has retained its mantle as Australia’s youngest capital city, according to estimates released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Darwin’s median age was 33.0 years at June 2013, compared with 34.6 years for Canberra, its nearest rival.

The Territory's capital also had the highest proportion of children in Australia.

“In 2013, 20.1% of Darwin’s population were under 15 years of age. Brisbane was next highest, at 19.7%”, said ABS Director of Demography, Denise Carlton.

Thamarrurr, which includes the community of Wadeye, had the highest proportion of children in Australia (37%) and the second lowest median age in the country (22.6 years).

Darwin also had the highest proportion of working age population (aged 15 to 64 years) of any capital city (73% in 2013).

However, only 7.1% of the city’s population were aged 65 years or over – by far the lowest proportion in Australia - with Canberra the next lowest at 11%.

Darwin also had the highest sex ratio of any capital city in Australia, with a ratio of 110.2 males to every 100 females.

For further information, see Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3235.0).

NT's Youth Population: Top 5 Areas, 2013
Area
State/Territory
% population
0-14 years
1Thamarrurr
NT
36.7
2Victoria River
NT
32.3
3Daly
NT
30.4
4West Arnhem
NT
30.1
5East Arnhem
NT
29.8



Population growth is familiar territory for Australia's capital

Population growth in the nation’s capital topped 9% over the past five years – the third fastest of the states and territories – thanks largely to new development in the north of Canberra, according to estimates released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Recently settled suburbs – such as Bonner, Casey and Crace – added more than 8,500 to the ACT population between 2008 and 2013, while areas such as Forde, Franklin and Harrison have grown by a total of 10,400 people over the same period.

“A considerable proportion of this growth has occurred among the working age population - people aged 15 to 64 years - as well as children under 15”, said ABS Director of Demography, Denise Carlton.

In Forde, the number of children increased by almost 1,000 between 2008 and 2013. People under 15 years of age now make up 30% of the area’s population, the highest proportion in the ACT.

The relatively new suburbs of Bonner and Harrison also had higher than average proportions of children in 2013 (29% and 28% respectively).

Overall, the ACT has the second youngest population in Australia (with a median age of 34.6 years), behind the Northern Territory (31.6).

Acton had the highest proportion of working age people in Australia in 2013 (98%) and the third lowest median age in the nation (22.8 years). Home to the Australian National University, it is populated mainly by students living on campus.

Overall, 70% of the ACT population were aged between 15 and 64 years in 2013, the second highest of any state or territory, after the Northern Territory (71%).

Just over 11% of the ACT's population were aged 65 years and over at June 2013. This was the second lowest of all states and territories, after the Northern Territory (6.2%).

For further information, see Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3235.0).

ACT's Largest Growing Areas, 2008-2013
Area
Total Population Increase, 2008-2013
Population Increase, 2008-2013
0-14 year olds
Population Increase, 2008-2013
15-64 year olds
1Franklin
4,074
1,060
2,939
2Bonner
3,845
1,097
2,675
3Forde
3,239
980
2,156
4Harrison
3,088
817
2,167
5Casey
2,881
711
2,092


Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window

Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.