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8149.0 - Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST), Australia, 1996  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 12/03/1999   
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  • Science people: More likely to be employed, paid more - ABS (Media Release)

MEDIA RELEASE

March 12, 1999
Embargoed: 11:30 AM (AEST)
31/99
Science people: More likely to be employed, paid more - ABS

The Australian Bureau of Statistics today published statistics showing the number of people in Australia who work in S&T occupations (i.e. professionals and specialist managers) and/or are qualified to do so (i.e. have relevant tertiary qualifications). The statistics are mainly based on the two most recent population censuses in Australia (1991 and 1996) and show the growth which has occurred over that period.

The data shows that people with science and technology (S&T) qualifications were more likely to be in the labour force and employed than those without such qualifications. These qualified people on average earned more money than other employees.

In addition the participation rate (persons in the labour force as a proportion of the population aged 15 years and over) for people with S&T qualifications was 82% at August 1996, compared with 56% for people without S&T qualifications.

The unemployment rate for people with S&T qualifications was 4% at August 1996, compared with 11% for persons without S&T qualifications.

Employed persons with S&T qualifications in 1996 earned $44,000 on average. If they were employed in S&T occupations they earned more ($47,000) than if they were employed in other occupations ($36,000).

The proportion of the population aged 15 years and over with S&T qualifications increased from 13% in 1991 to 17% in 1996, while the proportion who were employed in S&T occupations increased from 10% in 1991 to 12% in 1996.

Australia's human resources in science and technology (HRST) as a proportion of its population appears to be about average when compared to other countries. In a comparison with nine European countries for which comparable data are available, Australia ranked fourth.

Full details are in Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST), Australia, 1996 (cat. no. 8149.0), which is available in ABS Bookshops. A summary of the publication may be found on this site.

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