Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Release Date
3101.0 - Australian Demographic Statistics, Sep 1999  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 25/01/2001   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

Special Article - Population change in Australia (Sep, 1999)


This article was published in Australian Demographic Statistics, September Quarter 1999 (ABS Catalogue number 3101.0).


POPULATION GROWTH IN 1998-99


In the year ending June 1999, all the States and Territories, with the exception of Tasmania, recorded gains in population. Not all regions in Australia experienced population growth; 382 Local Government Areas (LGAs) gained or had no population growth, while 245 LGAs experienced population loss. The ABS publication Regional Population Growth, 1998-99 (Cat. no. 3218.0) shows that as in previous years, most of Australia's population growth (72%) in 1998-99 occurred in the capital cities.


Growth in the capital cities


Within the capital cities population growth occurred in several types of regions. Suburban areas contain housing developments that attract families because of their relative affordability while generally being close to the city to allow access to employment and services. Areas on the urban fringe have the advantage of being located within commuting distance of urban employment with access to a rural or coastal lifestyle. Within the inner cities population growth is associated with the development of medium and high density residential accommodation.


GROWTH IN THE CAPITAL CITIES - 1998-99

StateExamples of Local Government Areas (LGAs) or Statistical Local Areas (SLAs)

SUBURBAN GROWTH
NSWLGAsLiverpool (C), Camden (A), Hornsby (A), Penrith (C)
Vic.LGAsCasey (C), Brimbank (C), Knox (C)
QldSLAsDoolandella - Forest Lake, Parkinson - Drewvale
SALGAsTea Tree Gully (C), Marion (C)
WALGAsWanneroo (S), Swan (S), Rockingham (C)
NTLGAPalmerston (T)
ACTSLANicholls

GROWTH ON THE URBAN FRINGE
NSWLGAsWyong (A), Gosford (C)
Vic.LGAsHume (C), Casey (C)
QldLGACaboolture (S)
SALGAMount Barker (DC)
WALGAsHarvey (S), Dardanup (S), Mundaring (S)
Tas.LGAMeander Valley (M)
NTSLALitchfield (S) - Pt B

INNER CITY GROWTH
NSWLGASydney (C)
Vic.LGAMelbourne (C)
QldSLAFortitude Valley - Inner
SALGAAdelaide (C)
WALGAPerth (C)
NTSLAsLarrakeyah, Stuart Park, City - Inner


Growth outside of the capital cities


Areas located along the coastline, particularly in NSW, Victoria, Queensland, and the south-west corner of WA, continued to record population gains during 1998-99. Coastal areas are popular with older people wishing to retire and with younger people wanting a lifestyle change or who are attracted by service-based employment opportunities associated with tourism.

Population growth in 1998–99 also occurred in a number of inland regional centres, which provide goods and services to surrounding regions, and in mining centres.

GROWTH OUTSIDE THE CAPITAL CITIES - 1998-99

StateExamples of Local Government Areas (LGAs) or Statistical Local Areas (SLAs)

COASTAL GROWTH
NSWLGAsLake Macquarie (C), Shoalhaven (C), Hastings (A), Port Stephens (A)
Vic.LGAsMornington Peninsula (S), Surf Coast (S), Bass Coast (S)
QldLGAsGold Coast (C), Maroochy (S), Pine Rivers (S), Hervey Bay (C), Cairns (C)
SALGAVictor Harbor (DC)
WALGAsBusselton (S), Bunbury (C), Augusta-Margaret River (S), Broome (S)

REGIONAL CENTRE GROWTH
NSWLGAsBathurst (C), Cessnock (C), Dubbo (C), Griffith (C), Orange (C)
Vic.LGAsBallarat (C), Greater Bendigo (C), Greater Geelong (C), Mildura (RC)
QldLGAsTownsville (C), Toowoomba (C)
SALGAMount Gambier (DC)
WALGAKalgoorlie/Boulder (C)

MINING CENTRE GROWTH
NSWLGACobar (A)
QLDLGAEmerald (S)
SALGARoxby Downs (M)
WALGAKalgoorlie/Boulder (C)


POPULATION DECLINE


Three main types of regions have experienced population decline in 1998-99; inland rural areas, mining and manufacturing areas, and some urban areas. Population loss in rural Australia has been occurring for some time and is largely a result of net migration loss. In mining areas the population may fluctuate in response to changing market forces and economic restructuring. In urban areas population decline may reflect a life-cycle change as the younger generation moves away.

POPULATION DECLINE - 1998-99

StateExamples of Local Government Areas (LGAs) or Statistical Local Areas (SLAs)

RURAL DECLINE
NSWLGAsCooma–Monaro (A), Crookwell (A), Goulburn (C), Merriwa (A), Bombala (A)
Vic.LGAsArarat (RC), Buloke (S), Corangamite (S), Gannawarra (S), Yarriambiack (S)
QldLGAsAramac (S), Burke (S), Flinders (S), Murweh (S)
SALGAsMount Remarkable (DC), Southern Mallee (DC), Wakefield (DC)
WALGAsCollie (S), Katanning (S)

MINING CENTRE DECLINE
NSWLGABroken Hill (C)
Vic.LGALa Trobe (S)
QldLGAsMount Isa (C), Banana (S)
SALGAsWhyalla (C), Port Augusta (C)
WALGAsAshburton (S), East Pilbara (S)
Tas.LGAWest Coast (M)

URBAN POPULATION DECLINE
NSWLGABotany Bay (C)
Vic.LGAsGreater Dandenong (C), Maribyrnong (C)
QldSLAsInala, Acacia Ridge
SASLAsPlayford (C) - West, Port Adel. Enfield (C) - Coast
WALGAsVincent (T), Geraldton(C)
Tas.LGAsHobart (C), Launceston (C), Clarence (C), Glenorchy (C)
NTSLAsKarama, Rapid Creek, Leanyer, Malak
ACTSLAsO'Connor, Kaleen, Wanniassa, Kambah


Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window

Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.