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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2007  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/01/2007   
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Contents >> Education and Training >> Participation in education

PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION

In May 2005, 2.6 million people aged 15-64 years applied to enrol in a course of study. Of these, 92% gained a place and were enrolled in a course of study (table 10.23).


10.23 PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION(a) - May 2005

Males
Females
Persons
'000
'000
'000

Applied to enrol
1,244.7
1,379.7
2,624.4
Studying
1,147.8
1,272.8
2,420.6
Gained placement but deferred study
66.2
68.1
134.4
Unable to gain placement
30.7
38.7
69.4

(a) Persons aged 15-64 years.
Source: ABS data available on request, 2005 Survey of Education and Work.


In the period 2000-05 the demand for enrolment in education increased. Over the period, the number of people accepted into educational institutions also increased. Applications from persons aged 20-24 years increased by 85,600 (or 17%) (graph 10.24). The number of persons studying aged 20-24 years increased by 90,500 (20%), and students aged 25-64 years increased by 70,400 (9%). Those who applied but were not offered a place declined in all three age groups, down 3,000 (or 27%), 3,800 (24%) and 9,800 (17%) for persons aged 15-19, 20-24, and 25-64 years respectively. There was little change in the proportion of applicants who reported being unable to gain a place.

10.24 DEMAND FOR EDUCATION(a), By age group



Many young people continue in full-time education immediately after completing compulsory schooling, either in post-compulsory schooling or in other forms of education, such as VET. In May 2005, 69% of 15-19 year olds were in full-time education (including 50% still at school). Some young people return to full-time study following a period of absence after completing compulsory schooling. In the 20-24 years age cohort, excluding persons still at school, 26% were undertaking full-time tertiary study and 13% were undertaking part-time tertiary study (table 10.25).

Many people aged 25 years and over return to study, to upgrade their skills or to gain new skills, often while employed. Some 6% of all persons aged 25-64 years in May 2005, were studying part time, and 2% full time.


10.25 EDUCATION PARTICIPATION RATES(a) - May 2005

Age group (years)

15-19
20-24
25-64
%
%
%

Attending school
50.2
0.2
-
Attending tertiary(b)
Full time
18.3
25.8
2.0
Part time
7.5
12.9
5.8
Total
25.8
38.7
7.8
Attending
76.0
38.9
7.9
Not attending
24.0
61.1
92.1

(a) Persons aged 15-64 years.
(b) Educational institutions other than schools.
Source: ABS data available on request, 2005 Survey of Education and Work.


Between 2000 and 2005 the enrolment patterns of tertiary students aged 20-24 years changed, with full-time study increasing by 28%. The number of full-time students in this age group increased by 80,500 compared with an increase in part-time student numbers of 14,400 (9%). The number of both full-time and part-time students aged 25-64 years increased during the five-year period (31,900 and 50,700 respectively, an 11% overall increase). Decreases under 1% were recorded for full-time and part-time students aged 15-19 years (graph 10.26).

10.26 PARTICIPATION IN TERTIARY EDUCATION(a), By age group



EDUCATION AND WORK

Graph 10.27 shows the labour force status of all students aged 15-64 years in May 2005. Labour force participation was lowest among those in Year 12 or below, where 57% were not in the labour force. Of students who were in the labour force, 38% were enrolled for a bachelor degree or above.

10.27 PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION(a), By labour force status - May 2005



Among young people enrolled to study in May 2005, full-time employment was much higher among those aged 20-24 years than those aged 15-19 (27% compared with 8%). In both age groups, students who undertook part-time study were more frequently employed full-time than part-time.

FULL-TIME PARTICIPATION

The 'full-time participation rate' describes the proportion of the population who are fully engaged in education or work or a combination of both. This includes: full-time education; full-time work; or both part-time education and part-time work. The full-time participation rate can be useful to determine the proportion of young people not fully engaged in education and/or work, and who might be at risk of future marginal participation in the labour market.

In May 2005, 191,000 (or 14%) of young people aged 15-19 years and 305,400 (or 22%) of 20-24 year olds were not full-time participants. Some 49,000 (4%) of 15-19 year olds and 102,000 (7%) of 20-24 year olds were neither enrolled to study nor in the labour force (table 10.28).


10.28 YOUTH PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION, By labour force status - May 2005

Enrolled in all study(a)

Full time
Part time
Total
Not
enrolled
Total
'000
'000
'000
'000
'000

15-19 YEARS

In the labour force
Employed
Full time
14.5
72.6
87.1
147.3
234.5
Part time
377.6
21.3
398.9
80.5
479.3
Total
392.1
93.9
486.0
227.8
713.8
Unemployed
67.2
4.7
71.8
51.9
123.8
Not in the labour force
479.7
5.0
484.6
49.0
533.6
Total
939.0
103.5
1,042.5
328.7
1,371.2

20-24 YEARS

In the labour force
Employed
Full time
22.3
127.7
150.0
580.0
730.0
Part time
183.3
38.9
222.1
124.7
346.8
Total
205.5
166.6
372.1
704.7
1,076.8
Unemployed
19.2
7.3
26.5
61.6
88.2
Not in the labour force
144.8
9.5
154.3
102.3
256.6
Total
369.5
183.4
552.9
868.7
1,421.6

(a) All persons participating in education, including those whose study will not lead to a qualification.
Source: ABS data available on request, 2005 Survey of Education and Work.


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