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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2008  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 07/02/2008   
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Contents >> Energy >> Energy use

ENERGY USE

Total energy use

In 2005-06 Australia's total domestic energy use was 5,641 PJ, less than a third of the total energy it produced (16,729 PJ) (diagram 19.4). Over the period 1975-76 to 2005-06 there was a 107% increase in Australia's total energy use (graph 19.11).

19.11 Total energy use
Graph: 19.11 Total energy use



Energy conversion and supply losses

The energy conversion sectors accounted for approximately three-quarters (4,317 PJ) of total domestic energy use in 2005-06 (diagram 19.4). The energy conversion sectors (including electricity generators, petroleum refiners, operators of coke ovens and blast furnaces, and gas manufacturers) transform primary energy products into more useful, higher value-added derived energy products. For example, petroleum refiners transform crude oil into petroleum products such as petrol and diesel.

The electricity generation and petroleum refining sectors are the two main users of energy. In 2005-06 these two conversion sectors used 2,424 PJ and 1,432 PJ respectively (table 19.12). Since 2000-01, energy use by the electricity generation sector has increased by 12% and energy use by the petroleum refining sector has declined by 17%.

19.12 ENERGY USED IN CONVERSION, By sector

2000-01
2005-06
Change from 2000-01 to 2005-06
PJ
PJ
%

Coke oven operation
132
137
3.2
Briquetting
11
7
-36.1
Petroleum refining
1 729
1 432
-17.1
Electricity generation
2 168
2 424
11.8
Gas manufacturing
2
4
138.9
Other conversion(a)
84
68
-18.7
Fuel used in conversion
201
245
21.6
Total
4 326
4 317
-0.2

(a) Includes return streams to refineries from the petrochemical industry; consumption of coke in blast furnaces; blast furnace gas manufacture; electricity produced through cogeneration; and brown coal tar produced in tar manufacture.
Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 'Australian Energy Statistics - Australian Energy Update', 2005 and 2007, Table A.



Derived energy products

In 2005-06 Australia produced 2,461 PJ of derived energy products (diagram 19.4). These products included thermal electricity (847 PJ), automotive gasoline (570 PJ), diesel (397 PJ), aviation turbine fuel (192 PJ) and coal products (164 PJ) (table 19.13).

The production of derived energy remained essentially the same in 2005-06 as it was in 2000-01 (2,461 PJ in 2005-06 compared with 2,454 PJ in 2000-01). While the production of thermal energy increased from 740 PJ to 847 PJ (up 15%) in this period, there was a fall in the production of all petroleum products - automotive gasoline (down 13%), aviation turbine fuel (down 11%), fuel oil (down 38%), diesel (down 25%) and briquettes (down 79%). Other coal products increased slightly - coke up 3.4% and coal by-products up 2.7%.

Significant energy losses are involved in the process of transforming primary energy resources into derived energy products and in the delivery of derived energy products to the market. In 2005-06, almost a third (1,856 PJ) of the total energy available for domestic use was lost through the conversion processes and through distribution and transmission systems (diagram 19.4).

19.13 PRODUCTION OF DERIVED ENERGY

2000-01
2005-06
Change from 2000-01 to 2005-06
PJ
PJ
%

Coal products
Coke
94.9
98.1
3.4
Coal by-products
62.2
63.9
2.7
Briquettes
7.5
1.6
-78.7
Petroleum products
Automotive gasoline
651.6
570.2
-12.5
Aviation turbine fuel
214.8
191.9
-10.7
Fuel oil
68.3
42.6
-37.6
Diesel(a)
527.1
396.9
-24.7
Thermal electricity
739.9
847.2
14.5
Other
87.5
248.5
184.0
Total
2 453.8
2 460.9
0.3

(a) Includes automotive diesel oil and industrial and marine diesel fuel.
Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 'Australian Energy Statistics - Australian Energy Update', 2007, Table F.



Energy end-use by sector

In 2005-06 Australia's end-users of energy, comprising households and industries (excluding the conversion sectors), used 3,785 PJ of energy, an increase of 12% since 2000-01 (table 19.14).

19.14 ENERGY END-USE, By sector

2000-01
2005-06
Change from 2000-01 to 2005-06
PJ
PJ
%

Agriculture
86
93
8.5
Mining
266
391
47.2
Manufacturing
Iron and steel
101
106
5.5
Chemical
184
236
28.8
Other industry
792
866
9.4
Total
1 076
1 209
12.4
Construction
28
26
-7.1
Transport(a)
Road transport
954
1 021
7.0
 Rail transport
29
35
22.6
Air transport
198
202
1.8
Water transport
51
58
15.6
Total
1 231
1 316
6.9
Commercial(b)
227
240
5.5
Residential(c)
398
424
6.4
Other(d)
65
87
35.0
Total
3 376
3 785
12.1

(a) Includes all transport use, including household motor vehicle use.
(b) Includes wholesale and retail trade, communications, finance and insurance, property and business services, government administration and defence, education, health and community services, cultural and recreational services, and personal and other services, along with water, sewerage and drainage.
(c) Transport use by households is included in transport.
(d) Includes lubricants and greases, bitumen and solvents, as well as energy consumption in the gas production and distribution industries.
Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 'Australian Energy Statistics - Australian Energy Update' 2007, Table A.


The transport sector was the largest end-user of energy, using 1,316 PJ in 2005-06. In 2005-06 road transport accounted for 78% (1,021 PJ) of the transport sector's energy use, with the remaining contributors being air transport (202 PJ), water transport (58 PJ) and rail transport (35 PJ). The manufacturing sector was the second highest user of energy (1,209 PJ) in 2005-06. Together with the transport sector, these two sectors account for 67% of total energy end-use.

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