4172.0 - Arts and Culture in Australia: A Statistical Overview, 2004 (Reissue)  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 06/09/2006  Reissue
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READING

A survey conducted by ACNielsen for the government book promotion, Books Alive, in June 2001, found that 78% of people aged 18 years and over in Australia read for pleasure every day or on most days of the week. About 11% read occasionally during the month, 7% only read every few months while 4% never read. People more likely to read frequently were: females; older people; and those with post-school qualifications.

1.7 PERSONS AGED 18 YEARS AND OVER WHO READ FOR PLEASURE, By selected characteristics - June 2001

Percentage who read every day or most days of the week
Characteristics
%

Sex
Males
75
Females
82
Age group (years)
18-29
63
30-44
79
45-64
83
65 and over
86
Educational attainment
University or higher
87
Trade or diploma
80
Year 12
73
Some secondary
75
Total
78

Australia Council, A National Survey of Reading, Buying and Borrowing Books for Pleasure, conducted for Books Alive by ACNielsen.


The survey also found that the most popular reading material was newspapers, with 91% of people having read a newspaper for pleasure in the week before interview. This compares with 72% of people who had read books for pleasure and 63% who had read magazines in the same period.


A household survey conducted by the ABS on the activities of 5-14 year olds in 2003 showed that girls were more likely to read for pleasure than boys at any age. Overall, 82% of girls read for pleasure during the two-week reference period compared with 68% of boys.


Girls also read for longer than boys - the average time spent by girls who read for pleasure during the two-week period was 8.6 hours, compared with 7.1 hours for boys.

1.8 Children aged 5-14 years who read for pleasure(a) - April 2003
Graph: 1.8 Children aged 5–14 years who read for pleasure(a)—April 2003


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