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1344.8.55.001 - ACT Stats, 2005  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 14/02/2005   
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Contents >> Education in the ACT - Feb 2005

Information in this article has been taken from Education and Work Australia, (cat. no. 6227.0) and is the result of a survey conducted in May 2004. The survey collected information on people aged 15-64.

Non-school qualification

As at May 2004, there were 129,200 people aged 15-64 in the ACT with a non-school qualification - equivalent to 58% of the population of that age group. The total without a non-school qualification was 94,500 (42%).

Nationally, people with a non-school qualification accounted for 51% of the population aged 15-64. Those without a non-school qualification accounted for 49%

Educational attainment

More males than females achieved their highest level of educational attainment in the areas of Postgraduate Degree and Certificate III/IV. More females achieved their highest level of educational attainment in the areas of Bachelor Degree and completion of Year 12 and Year 10.


LEVEL OF HIGHEST EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT, BY SEX - MAY 2004
graph: LEVEL OF HIGHEST EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT, BY SEX - MAY 2004


At May 2004, 30% of people in the ACT aged 15-64 had a level of educational attainment equal to a Bachelor Degree or above. Nationally, 19% of those aged 15-64 had a Bachelor Degree or above.

Level of education of current study

Approximately 49,900 ACT people between the ages of 15 and 64 were enrolled in a course of study - of these, 18% were not Australian born. Females accounted for 54% of ACT enrolments and males 46%. Nationally females accounted for 53% of enrolments and males accounted for 47%.

Thirty-nine percent of ACT people enrolled in a course of study were aged 15-19 (19,500 students). A further 25% were aged 20-24 (12,300), and 16% were aged 25-34 (8,200).


AGE BREAKDOWN, PERSONS ENROLLED IN A COURSE OF STUDY - MAY 2004
graph: ACT AGE BREAKDOWN, PERSONS ENROLLED IN A COURSE OF STUDY - MAY 2004


Ninety-seven percent (48,500) of people enrolled in a course of study, were enrolled in a course which led to a qualification. The most common form of study was a Bachelor Degree, with one-third (33%) of all enrolments. This was followed by an Advanced Diploma with 11% of enrolments.

Nationally, 27% of people enrolled in study were completing a Bachelor Degree (663,600), which was comparable to the ACT; followed by 10% studying Year 10 (237,500).
LEVEL OF EDUCATION OF CURRENT STUDY, ACT May 2004
People ('000)
People (%)
Postgraduate Degree
3.9
8
Graduate Diploma/Graduate Certificate
2.0
4
Bachelor Degree
16.5
33
Advanced Diploma
5.4
11
Certificate III/IV
3.4
7
Certificate I/II
**0.5
*1
Certificate n.f.d.
2.2
4
Year 12
3.6
7
Year 11
4.8
10
Year 10 or below
5.6
11
Level not determined
*0.6
*1
Study leading to a qualification(a)
48.5
97
Study not leading to a qualification
*1.4
*3
Total Currently Enrolled
49.9
100

* Estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.
** Estimate has a relative standard error greater than 50% and is considered too unreliable for general use.
(a) Includes boarding school pupils.

Participation in the labour force

Of the 49,900 people enrolled in a course of study in the ACT at May 2004, 29% were employed full-time and 38% were employed part-time. A further 4% were unemployed and 29% were not in the labour force.
LABOUR FORCE PARTICIPATION - MAY 2004


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