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6310.0 - Employee Earnings, Benefits and Trade Union Membership, Australia, Aug 2010 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 06/05/2011   
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SUMMARY OF FINDINGS


OVERVIEW

In August 2010, there were 9.8 million employees (5.2 million males and 4.6 million females). Of these, 70% were full-time employees in their main job (84% of male employees and 54% of female employees). Other characteristics of employees included:

  • mean weekly earnings for employees in their main job was $1,024;
  • 18% were trade union members in their main job;
  • 90% had contributions made by their current employer into a superannuation scheme on their behalf; and
  • 726,500 (7%) were owner managers of incorporated enterprises (OMIEs).


WEEKLY EARNINGS

Mean weekly earnings in all jobs

The mean weekly earnings of employees in all jobs in August 2010 was $1,035, an increase of $40 since August 2009. Mean weekly earnings in all jobs for males was $1,227 compared to $819 for females. Mean weekly earnings for full-time workers was $1,267 compared to $468 for part-time workers.

Mean weekly earnings, in all jobs, has increased by 57% during the 10 years to August 2010, from $659 in August 2000 to $1,035 in August 2010. Changes in mean weekly earnings may be affected not only by changes in the rate of pay, but also by changes in the composition of the Australian workforce, including:
  • diversity of employment arrangements;
  • number of hours worked;
  • the extent of part-time and casual employment; and
  • mix of industries and occupations.


Mean weekly earnings in main job
Mean weekly earnings in main job (a), By age and sex
Graph: Mean weekly earnings in main job (a), By age and sex


The mean weekly earnings for employees in their main job in August 2010 was $1,218 for males and $805 for females. Males aged 35-44 years had the highest mean weekly earnings at $1,500, whilst for females, it was those aged 25-34 years at $912. The mean weekly earnings in the main job were higher for males than for females in every age group. The greatest difference in mean weekly earnings between male and female employees was for those aged 35-44 years (a difference of $620 per week), while the smallest difference, $84, was for those aged 15-19 years.


Median weekly earnings in main job

In August 2010, the median weekly earnings in main job for all employees was $870. Median weekly earnings was the highest for employees who worked in the mining industry ($1,900). By occupation, the highest median was for Managers ($1,211), followed by Professionals ($1,187). Median weekly earnings was lowest for employees who worked in the Accommodation and food services industry ($402). By occupation, the lowest median was for Sales workers ($489).


Weekly earnings in main job
Distribution of Weekly earnings in main job, By full-time status in main job
Graph: Distribution of Weekly earnings in main job, By full-time status in main job


Distribution of Weekly earnings in main job, By part-time status in main job
Graph: Distribution of Weekly earnings in main job, By part-time status in main job


As would be expected, the distribution of weekly earnings of part-time employees is concentrated at the lower end with 60% earning under $500 per week. For full-time employees, 56% earn $1,000 or more per week.


TRADE UNION MEMBERSHIP IN MAIN JOB

The proportion of employees who were trade union members in their main job decreased from 20% in August 2009 to 18% in August 2010. This was a decrease of 47,300 employees from the previous year.

Data collected about trade union members in their main job for August 2010 also showed:
  • 20% of full-time employees, and 14% of part-time employees were trade union members in their main job;
  • 41% of public sector employees compared to 14% of private sector employees were trade union members in their main job; and
  • Tasmania had the highest proportion (24%), while the Northern Territory had the lowest proportion (14%) of employees who were trade union members in their main job.

Proportion of trade union membership(a), By industry
Graph: Proportion of trade union membership(a), By industry


Employees in the Education and training industry Division had the highest proportion of trade union membership in their main job (39%), followed by Electricity, gas, water and waste services (37%). The industry Division with the lowest proportion of trade union membership in their main job was Agriculture, forestry and fishing (2%).


SUPERANNUATION CONTRIBUTIONS PAID BY EMPLOYER

In August 2010, 90% of all employees had superannuation contributions paid into a superannuation scheme on their behalf by their employer. A higher proportion of full-time employees had superannuation contributions paid into a superannuation scheme on their behalf than part-time employees (94% and 79% respectively).

Over 90% of employees earning over $500 per week had superannuation contributions paid into a superannuation scheme by their employer. Of this group, 97% of those earning between $1,200 and under $1,800 had superannuation contributions paid into a superannuation scheme. In contrast, employees earning less than $400 per week were less likely to have superannuation contributions paid into a superannuation scheme by their employer. For example, 61% of those earning under $200 and 77% of those earning at least $200 but under $300 had superannuation contributions paid into a superannuation scheme by their employer.


EMPLOYEES (EXCLUDING OMIES)

With paid leave entitlements

In August 2010, there were 9.0 million employees1 (4.7 million males and 4.4 million females). Of these, 6.8 million (76%) had paid leave entitlements. A higher proportion of male employees1 had paid leave entitlements (79%) than female employees1 (72%).

The occupation group with the highest proportion of employees1 with paid leave entitlements was Managers (93%), followed by Professionals (88%). The occupation group with the lowest proportion with paid leave entitlements was Labourers (52%).


Mean weekly earnings in main job

Mean weekly earnings in main job for employees1 was $1,007 ($1,199 for males and $802 for females). Employees1 with paid leave entitlements had higher mean weekly earnings in main job ($1,155) then those without paid leave entitlements ($546).


Trade union membership in main job

Of all employees1, 1.8 million were trade union members in their main job. Of these:
  • 51% were male;
  • 91% had paid leave entitlements;
  • 31% were in the Professionals occupation group;
  • 19% worked in the Education and training industry Division; and
  • 18% in the Health care and assistance industry Division.


Without paid leave entitlements

In August 2010, 2.2 million (24%) employees1 did not have paid leave entitlements (a proxy measure for casual employment) in their main job, that is, they were not entitled to either paid sick leave or paid holiday leave in their main job (or did not know if they were entitled). Of these:
  • 55% were female;
  • 20% were aged 15-19 years, and 59% were aged under 35 years;
  • 70% were part-time employees1;
  • 21% were in each of the Sales workers and Labourers occupation groups; and
  • 19% were in each of the Retail trade and the Accommodation and food services industry Divisions.


Types of paid leave entitlements

Employees1 can have a number of different paid leave entitlements, namely holiday leave, sick leave, long service leave and maternity/paternity leave.

In August 2010, 77% of employees1 had one or more paid leave entitlements while 23% had no paid leave entitlements at all. Only 36% reported that they had all paid leave entitlements2. The most common paid leave entitlements held by employees1 were paid holiday leave or paid sick leave (both 75%).

Comparisons for some key population groups in relation to whether employees1 had all of the paid leave entitlements2 show:
  • 41% of the 4.4 million female employees1 had all paid leave entitlements2, compared to 30% of the 4.7 million male employees1;
  • 42% of the 6.3 million full-time employees1 had all paid leave entitlements2, compared to 21% of the 2.8 million part-time employees1; and
  • 64% of the 1.6 million employees1 in the public sector had all paid leave entitlements2, compared to 29% of the 7.4 million employees1 in the private sector.

Overall, the industry Divisions with the highest proportion of employees1 with all of the paid leave entitlements2 were Public administration and safety (64%) and Financial and insurance services (62%). In contrast, only 8% of employees in the Accommodation and food services industry Division had all paid leave entitlements2, while in the same industry Division, 64% had no paid leave entitlements.

Over half (54%) of the employees1 whose occupation was Professionals in August 2010 had all paid leave entitlements2. In contrast, 20% of Sales workers and 16% of Labourers had all paid leave entitlements2, while 44% of Sales workers and 45% of Labourers had no paid leave entitlements.


END NOTE

1. Excluding owner managers of incorporated enterprises.

2. Refers to the entitlement of paid holiday leave, paid sick leave, paid long service leave and paid maternity/paternity leave.


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