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5673.0.55.003 - Wage and Salary Earner Statistics for Small Areas, Time Series, 2003-04 to 2006-07  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 12/03/2010   
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Introduction

Trends in Average Wages and Salaries, 2003-04 to 2006-07

Regional Variations in Average Annual Growth Rates

Western Australia: A Regional Analysis


INTRODUCTION

This article and the accompanying data are provided to support analyses of local economic conditions for regions throughout Australia. The data are produced by the ABS using personal income tax (PIT) information from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

Wage and salary statistics in this release are presented for the years 2003-04 to 2006-07 on a range of geographic levels. These data have been compiled on a different basis to previous releases of Wage and salary earner data for 2003-04 to 2005-06 released in Regional Wage and Salary Earner Statistics, Australia. Users should therefore exercise caution in comparing data in this release with data in Regional Wage and Salary Earner Statistics, Australia. For further information, please refer to the Explanatory Notes.

In 2006-07, around 9.3 million Australians derived income from Wages and salaries. Over $392 billion - around 78% of all income earned by Australian taxpayers - was earned from Wages and salaries in 2006-07. As the economic well-being of most Australians is largely determined by the amount of income they receive, analysing geographical variations in Wages and salaries - and how these change over time - can provide valuable information about relative advantage and disadvantage in regions and the nature of regional economies in general. Wealth is also an important contributor to economic well-being; some people on low incomes may have property and business assets to draw on, whilst others on high incomes may also have high levels of debt.

The data presented in this article can be used to explore questions such as:

  • have average incomes from Wages and salaries increased over time, and if so by how much?
  • which regions experienced higher growth in average Wages and salaries income compared to others?
  • have average incomes from Wages and salaries increased at higher rates in capital city areas compared with regions outside capital cities?
  • which regions with high average incomes from Wages and salaries also experienced high growth rates in Wages and salaries?
  • which regions with low average income experienced high growth rates in Wages and salaries?

The first part of this article will provide an overview of average Wage and salary incomes from 2003-04 to 2006-07, highlighting changes in average annual growth rates between and within Australian states and territories. This section of the article will also identify those regions with either high or low average Wage and salary income (based on 2006-07 data) that experienced high average annual growth rates in average Wages and salaries over time.

The second part of the article will focus specifically on the regions in one state of Australia to illustrate how the data in this release can be used to explore the characteristics of regions at the small area level. Western Australia has been chosen as the focus for this article because it had the highest average annual growth rate in average Wage and salary income of all Australian states and territories, for the period 2003-04 to 2006-07. This analysis includes a brief look at the occupation of Wage and salary earners at the regional level. This section will also draw on additional data about regions from a range of other sources (e.g. ABS Census of Population and Housing, 2006; and Estimated Resident Population data, from Regional Population Growth, Australia, cat. no. 3218.0). Regional summary data from a wide range of sources can be found in the National Regional Profile.

This article illustrates only a few ways Wage and salary data can be used to explore regional variations in income. Further analysis of regional incomes can be undertaken using the data contained in the spreadsheets attached to this article.

The statistics have been compiled using aggregated individual income tax data from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) wishes to acknowledge the invaluable support of the ATO in compiling these statistics.


TRENDS IN AVERAGE WAGES AND SALARIES, 2003-04 TO 2006-07

On average, Australians earned $42,081 in Wages and salaries in 2006-07; up from $40,276 in the previous year. Over the period 2003-04 to 2006-07, the average annual growth rate in average Wage and salary income in Australia was 4.5%. This was during a period of strong economic growth, with Gross Domestic Product increasing at an average rate of 8.6% per annum over the four year period (Australian National Accounts: National Income, Expenditure and Product, Sep 2009, cat. no. 5206.0) and the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate falling from 5.5% in June 2004 to 4.3% in June 2007 (Labour Force, Australia, Jan 2010, cat. no. 6202.0).

Table 1 shows that the Australian Capital Territory recorded the highest average annual income in each year between 2003-04 and 2006-07.

Western Australia recorded the highest growth in average annual Wages and salaries between 2003-04 and 2006-07 (6.2%), followed by Queensland (5.4%), and the Australian Capital Territory (4.7%). The high growth rate for Western Australia resulted in that state having the third highest average annual Wage and salary income in 2006-07, moving up from fifth highest in 2003-04. For all States and Territories, and for Australia as a whole, average annual growth rates for regions outside of capital cities either matched or were slightly higher than those for capital city Statistical Divisions (SDs), although average annual incomes were considerably higher in capital city SDs.

Table 1. Average Annual Wages and Salaries, by State and Territory, 2003-04 to 2006-07

Average Annual Income
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Average
Annual
Growth
Rate
Region
$
$
$
$
%

New South Wales
39 648
41 433
43 032
44 850
4.2
Sydney SD
42 811
44 799
46 425
48 428
4.2
Balance NSW
33 360
34 774
36 307
37 717
4.2
Victoria
36 882
38 421
39 861
41 260
3.8
Melbourme SD
38 762
40 368
41 840
43 302
3.8
Balance Victoria
31 412
32 720
34 041
35 188
3.9
Queensland
33 965
35 655
37 680
39 735
5.4
Brisbane SD
35 775
37 461
39 597
41 720
5.3
Balance Qld
32 243
33 944
35 879
37 867
5.5
South Australia
33 623
35 061
36 357
37 830
4.0
Adelaide SD
34 728
36 229
37 521
38 936
3.9
Balance SA
30 357
31 586
32 894
34 534
4.4
Western Australia
36 048
38 219
40 575
43 226
6.2
Perth SD
36 523
38 712
41 095
43 785
6.2
Balance WA
34 553
36 679
38 932
41 428
6.2
Tasmania
31 358
32 467
33 903
35 288
4.0
Greater Hobart SD
33 021
34 118
35 660
37 065
3.9
Balance Tas
30 091
31 199
32 527
33 898
4.1
Northern Territory
37 665
40 016
41 589
43 027
4.5
Darwin SD
39 437
42 222
43 723
45 014
4.5
Balance NT
34 466
35 983
37 618
39 278
4.5
Australian Capital Territory
42 834
45 922
47 061
49 116
4.7
Canberra SD
42 841
45 932
47 071
49 122
4.7
Balance ACT
40 061
43 031
44 503
46 868
5.4
Australia
36 889
38 607
40 276
42 081
4.5
All capital cities
39 112
40 939
42 620
44 495
4.4
Balance of Australia
32 452
33 963
35 615
37 259
4.7



Within each state and territory there is some variation in the rates of growth across small areas, such as Statistical Local Areas (SLAs). The degree of variation in rates of growth across these areas can be assessed statistically by looking at the standard deviation of growth rates of average annual wage and salary income. Standard deviation is a measure of the variation of data points around the mean of those data points. In a normally distributed set of data, approximately 68% of data points will fall within one standard deviation of the mean.

Table 2 shows that Western Australia (Balance of State) had an average annual growth rate in average Wage and salary income of 6.2%, with a standard deviation of 2.8%. That is, around 68% of Statistical Local Areas outside the capital city of Perth had an average annual growth rate of Wages and salaries between 3.4% and 9.0% (6.2% +/- 2.8%). While Perth SD also experienced a 6.2% average annual growth rate in Wages and salaries, variations in growth rates between SLAs in the capital were less pronounced than the rest of the state, as shown by a standard deviation of 0.9%

Table 2. Average Annual Growth Rate of Statistical Local Area Average Wages and Salaries, 2003-04 to 2006-07

Capital City SD
Balance of State/Territory
State/Territory
Average Annual Growth
Standard Deviation
Average Annual Growth
Standard Deviation
Average Annual Growth
Standard Deviation
Region
%
%
%
%
%
%

New South Wales
4.2
1.5
4.2
0.8
4.2
1.1
Victoria
3.8
0.6
3.9
1.0
3.8
0.9
Queensland
5.3
1.0
5.5
1.3
5.4
1.2
South Australia
3.9
0.6
4.4
1.2
4.0
1.1
Western Australia
6.2
0.9
6.2
2.8
6.2
2.5
Tasmania
3.9
0.2
4.1
1.0
4.0
1.0
Northern Territory
4.5
0.9
4.5
1.5
4.5
1.2
Australian Capital Territory
4.7
0.9
5.4
n/a
4.7
0.9



In contrast, Sydney SD, with an average annual growth rate of 4.2% - equal to that of New South Wales (Balance of State) - had a larger variation in growth rates as shown by a higher standard deviation (1.5%, compared with 0.8% for the rest of the state).


REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH RATES

Which Statistical Local Areas experienced the highest growth in average Wage and Salary income between 2003-04 and 2006-07? Map 1 shows significant variations in average annual growth rates across Australia.


MAP 1. GROWTH OF AVERAGE INCOME FROM WAGES AND SALARIES, Statistical Local Areas, Australia, 2003-04 to 2006-07
Diagram: Map showing growth of Average Annual Income by SLA, 2003-04 to 2006-07


The vast majority of SLAs with the highest average annual growth rate of average Wage and salary income between 2003-04 and 2006-07 were located in Western Australia and Queensland. In Western Australia, these included over twenty inland and coastal SLAs surrounding Perth that offered semi-rural or rural lifestyles within 2-3 hours drive of the city (e.g. the SLAs of Wandering, Cuballing, Boddington and Dandaragan) and also the remote mining area of Ravensthorpe in the state's south east. In Queensland, many of the areas of highest growth were associated with emerging energy resource sectors (e.g. Dalby-Chinchilla in the state's Western Downs region and Barcoo in the state's south-west). Other SLAs with high growth rates were located in Queensland's Central Highlands and in Mackay (which contains much of the region's engineering, manufacturing and mining services industries).

However, high growth rates do not necessarily equate to high incomes. For example, whilst the SLA of Kojonup (in Western Australia's wheatbelt) experienced a 8.6% average annual increase in average Wage and salary income between 2003-04 and 2006-07, by the end of the period the average annual income in the area was just $29,552 (well below the national average of $42,081). Some SLAs with high average Wage and salary incomes experienced low average annual growth rates, while other regions recorded both low incomes and low growth rates in average Wages and salaries. Table 3 presents a selection of SLAs that fall into each of these four categories. SLAs were grouped according to whether their average annual incomes in 2006-07 fell in the top or bottom 20% of SLAs and whether their average annual growth rate in average Wages and salaries was above or below the Australian rate of 4.5%.

Table 3. Selected Statistical Local Areas by Average Annual Income and Growth Rate

High Income(a)
Low Income(b)

High Growth(c)
Mosman (A) (New South Wales)
Bundaberg ( R) - Kolan (Queensland)
Cottesloe (T) (Western Australia)
Acton (Australian Capital Territory)
Balmoral (Queensland)
Cook (S) (Queensland)
Mount Isa (C) (Queensland)
Denmark (S) (Western Australia)
Low Growth(d)
Baulkham Hills (A) - South (New South Wales)
Loddon (S) - North (Victoria)
Red Hill (Australian Capital Territory)
Dorset (M) (Tasmania)
Stonnington ( C) - Malvern (Victoria)
Tenterfield (A) (New South Wales)
Burnside (C) - North-East (South Australia)
The Coorong (DC) (South Australia)

(a) Average Annual Income in 2006/07 in top Quintile (above $45,809)
(b) Average Annual Income in 2006/07 in bottom Quintile (below $32,330)
(c) Average Annual Growth Rate in Wages and salaries between 2003/04 and 2006/07 above national rate (4.5%)
(d) Average Annual Growth Rate in Wages and salaries between 2003/04 and 2006/07 below national rate (4.5%)


High income/high growth regions included Mt Isa (C), in north-west Queensland. Mt Isa had an average income of $52,416 in 2006-07, and an average annual growth rate in average income of 7.5%.

Stonnington (C) - Malvern SLA, in Melbourne's south-east, is an example of a high income/low growth region, with an average annual income of $59,188 in 2006-07, but an average annual growth rate of just 3.9%.

Some regions recorded high growth rates, while remaining low income regions. Denmark SLA (in Western Australia's south-west), is an example of a low income/high growth region, recording an income of $29,822 in 2006-07 following an average annual growth rate of 7.4%.

Other regions recorded both low income and low growth rates in this period. For example, Loddon - North (in north-west Victoria) was a low income/low growth region, with an average income of $25,800 in 2006-07 and an average annual growth rate of 2.9%.

Map 2 shows the geographical distribution of all SLAs in Australia according to the four income/growth categories in Table 3. Regions with high average annual incomes and high average annual growth rates include SLAs in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane, Perth and Sydney and remote mining areas in Western Australia and Queensland. Regions with low average annual incomes and high average annual growth rates include: the Far North and central Queensland; SLAs north-west and south-west of Perth; SLAs in western Victoria; parts of the Murray-Darling region of New South Wales; and SLAs in the mid-north and west coast of South Australia.

Map 2. STATISTICAL LOCAL AREAS BY AVERAGE WAGE AND SALARY INCOME 2006-07 AND GROWTH RATES
Diagram: Map Showing Statistical Local Areas by Average Wage and salary income (2006-07) and Growth Rates (2003-04 to 2006-07)




WESTERN AUSTRALIA: A REGIONAL ANALYSIS

As shown in this article, Western Australia recorded the highest growth in average annual Wage and salary income of all states and territories between 2003-04 and 2006-07. Also during this period:
In this section, variations in average annual growth rates will be explored in greater detail at the small area level, specifically in relation to Statistical Divisions (SDs) and Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) in Western Australia.

Table 4 shows that average annual growth rates between 2003-04 and 2006-07 were relatively high for all regions in Western Australia, ranging from 5.8% for South Eastern SD (a vast, mostly desert or semi-desert region incorporating mining centres such as Kalgoorlie and the coastal port of Esperance) to 6.6% for the SD of Midlands (traditionally an agricultural region that is becoming increasingly attractive for people seeking a rural lifestyle with close proximity to Perth).

Table 4. Wages and salaries for Statistical Divisions, Western Australia, 2003-04 to 2006-07

Average Annual Income
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Average
Annual
Growth
Rate
Standard
Deviation
Region
$
$
$
$
%
%

Australia
36 889
38 607
40 276
42 081
4.5
1.5
Western Australia
36 048
38 219
40 575
43 226
6.2
2.4
Perth SD
36 523
38 712
41 095
43 785
6.2
0.9
WA Balance
34 553
36 679
38 932
41 428
6.2
2.8
South West SD
33 120
35 502
37 890
39 965
6.5
1.2
Lower Great Southern SD
27 293
28 950
30 779
32 526
6.0
1.7
Upper Great Southern SD
25 534
27 179
28 487
30 698
6.3
2.3
Midlands SD
29 468
31 463
33 377
35 672
6.6
2.5
South Eastern SD
40 640
43 084
45 171
48 146
5.8
6.4
Central SD
31 716
33 555
35 527
37 928
6.1
2.9
Pilbara SD
51 883
54 132
57 784
62 381
6.3
0.7
Kimberley SD
33 912
36 087
37 891
40 805
6.4
0.7



However, there were substantial variations in growth rates within SDs, as shown by the standard deviations for each region. The South Eastern SD recorded the greatest variation in average annual growth rates: from 2.9% for the SLA of Menzies (a former gold mining area) to 24.2% for Ravensthorpe, where the establishment of a nickel mine in 2005 coincided with a significant increase in average annual income from Wages and salaries (from $25,999 in 2003-04 to $49,083 in 2006-07).

Map 3 shows variations in average annual growth rates between SLAs in Western Australia. Regions that recorded average annual growth rates above 8% between 2003-04 and 2006-07 included: the SLAs of Dandaragan, Irwin, Yalgoo and Murchison north of Perth; the SLAs of Boddington, Wandering, Cuballing and Kojonup in the state's south-east; and Mosman Park SLA in Perth.


Map 3. GROWTH AND AVERAGE INCOME FROM WAGES AND SALARIES, Statistical Local Areas, Western Australia, 2003-04 to 2006-07
Diagram: Map showing growth and Average Annual Income from Wages and salaries, Statistical Local Areas, Western Australia


To demonstrate how these data can be used to further explore regional variations in Wage and salary income, this article will now focus on the Statistical Division of South West. This region includes major urban centres such as Mandurah and Bunbury, and has a diverse economic base, incorporating a wide range of agricultural, mining, processing, manufacturing, tourist and service activities.

Table 5 shows that, in 2006-07, average annual incomes in the South West SD ranged from $31,424 in the SLA of Manjimup (comprising a national park/state forest, timber mills and an extensive fruit and vegetable industry) to $49,064 in Boddington SLA (a 90 minute drive from Perth, with a strong agricultural base, an increasing number of lifestyle/hobby farms and - most recently - expansion of gold mining activity in the region). Boddington also recorded the highest average annual growth rate in average Wage and salary income - 9.2% - in the South West SD.

Table 5. Average Wages and Salaries, South West Statistical Division, 2003-04 to 2006-07

Average Annual Income
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Average
Annual
Growth
Rate
No. Wage
and salary
earners
2006-07
Region
$
$
$
$
%
no.

Mandurah
34 715
37 157
40 290
42 254
6.8
23 557
  Mandurah (C)
34 673
37 076
40 242
42 130
6.7
23 692
  Murray (S)
34 909
37 538
40 518
42 809
7.0
5 265
Bunbury
34 973
37 562
39 590
41 557
5.9
24 101
  Bunbury (C)
34 419
36 992
38 915
40 570
5.6
14 870
  Capel (S) - Pt A
34 350
36 931
38 872
40 448
5.6
3 163
  Dardanup (S) - Pt A
35 754
37 530
40 099
42 539
6.0
4 071
  Harvey (S) - Pt A
36 216
39 387
41 284
43 795
6.5
6 340
Preston
35 248
37 265
39 878
42 190
6.2
13 361
  Boddington (S)
37 709
41 944
46 415
49 064
9.2
608
  Capel (S) - Pt B
33 867
35 227
37 090
38 413
4.3
1 928
  Collie (S)
40 226
41 867
44 713
46 960
5.3
4 016
  Dardanup (S) - Pt B
33 172
36 377
39 331
42 314
8.5
1 215
  Donnybrook-Balingup (S)
29 955
32 327
33 782
36 046
6.4
2 140
  Harvey (S) - Pt B
33 276
35 296
37 963
40 410
6.7
3 685
  Waroona (S)
36 246
38 313
41 660
44 521
7.1
1 502
Vasse
27 951
30 323
32 003
34 169
6.9
14 400
  Augusta-Margaret River (S)
27 165
29 408
31 160
33 226
6.9
5 177
  Busselton (S)
28 311
30 732
32 370
34 586
6.9
11 691
Blackwood
27 794
29 624
31 255
33 349
6.3
6 802
  Boyup Brook (S)
25 904
28 530
29 740
32 711
8.1
592
  Bridgetown-Greenbushes (S)
30 851
32 311
35 117
37 847
7.1
1 827
  Manjimup (S)
26 624
28 492
29 584
31 424
5.7
4 210
  Nannup (S)
29 196
30 564
33 200
33 847
5.1
529



This article is accompanied by a range of data on age, sex, occupation and income for those deriving income from Wages and salaries for the years 2003-04 to 2006-07. These data can be used to explore, for example, variations across different occupational and income groups at the regional level.

Figure 1 compares the proportion of Wage and salary earners in Australia, Western Australia and the South West SD that fall into the 2006 Census categories of Lower (less than $20,800 average annual income), Medium ($20,800-$52,000) and Higher (over $52,000) Incomes (A Picture of the Nation: the Statistician's Report on the 2006 Census, 2006, cat. no. 2070.0) (Note: the Higher Income category has been further divided into those earning average annual incomes above and below $83,200). For Australia, Western Australia and South West SD, the proportion of those in the lower and medium income groups fell between 2003-04 and 2006-07. Over the same period, the proportion of Wage and salary earners in the higher (including very high) income brackets has increased. This has particularly been the case for those earning more than $83,200; the proportion of Wage and salary earners in this category increased from 5.6% in 2003-04 to 10.6% in 2006-07 for Western Australia, and from 4.2% to 10.1% for the South West SD.

Figure 1. Proportion of Wage and salary earners by Income range: Australia, Western Australia and South West Statistical Division, 2003-04 and 2006-07


Table 6 shows that this increase in the number of high income earners has occurred in all Statistical Subdivisions (SSDs) within the South West SD, with the largest increases in the SSDs of Mandurah and Preston.

Table 6. Individuals with Average Wage and salary income over $83 200, South West SD, 2003-04 to 2006-07

Proportion of Wage and salary Earners
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Region
%
%
%
%

Australia
5.4
6.3
7.3
8.6
Western Australia
5.6
7.0
8.6
10.6
South West SD
4.2
5.7
8.1
10.0
Mandurah SSD
5.2
7.0
10.3
12.9
Bunbury SSD
4.4
6.1
8.2
9.8
Preston SSD
5.1
6.6
10.2
12.6
Vasse SSD
2.8
3.6
4.6
5.6
Blackwood SSD
1.6
2.6
3.4
4.8



Table 7 presents similar data at the Statistical Local Area (SLA) level, and shows the proportion of Wage and salary earners with average annual incomes over $83,200 has increased in all SLAs within the Mandurah and Preston SSDs. This article will focus on the more populated SLAs of Mandurah and Collie.

Table 7. Individuals with Average Wage and Salary Income over $83,200 by SLA

Percentage of all W&S Earners >$83,200
Number of W&S Earners >$83,200
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Region
%
%
%
%
no.
no.
no.
no.

Mandurah
Mandurah ( C)
5.3
7.0
10.3
12.9
1 018
1 443
2 277
3 045
Murray (S)
4.9
7.1
10.5
13.2
208
315
498
693
Preston
Boddington (S)
4.0
10.5
15.1
18.9
20
55
83
115
Capel (S) - Pt B
3.4
4.7
6.5
7.3
57
84
121
140
Collie (S)
10.3
11.5
17.0
19.7
377
428
667
793
Dardanup (S) - Pt B
3.3
5.7
8.1
11.2
35
62
94
136
Donnybrook-
Balingup (S)
2.4
3.8
5.3
7.3
45
75
110
156
Harvey (S) - Pt B
3.0
4.3
7.2
9.5
96
145
254
351
Waroona (S)
3.5
5.2
10.1
14.2
48
74
150
214



Both SLAs of Mandurah and Collie experienced a significant increase in the number and proportion of Wage and salary earners with average annual incomes greater than $83,200 between 2003-04 and 2006-07. Almost 20% of Wage and salary earners in Collie and 13% of those in Mandurah now fall into this income group. Mandurah is a rapidly growing coastal city located 74km south of Perth. It is the most populous centre in the South West region, with an estimated resident population of 61,624 in June 2007; an increase of 3.9 per cent from the previous year (Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2007-08, cat. no. 3218.0). The area features a marina and man-made canals, and serves as a commuter town for people working at the Aluminium Refinery in Pinjarra, in the heavy industry at Kwinana, and those making the daily commute north to Perth. Collie is home to two major coal mining companies, a power station and bauxite refinery. The area is currently undergoing further industrial expansion, although during the period 2004-07, Collie's population was relatively stable.

A closer examination of the incomes earned by these occupational groups (and how they have changed over time) reveal significant regional variations.

Table 8. Individuals Earning Average Annual Wages and Salaries over $83,200 by Occupation, 2003-04 and 2006-07

Mandurah SLA
Collie SLA
South West SD
Western Australia
Australia
2003-04
2006-07
2003-04
2006-07
2003-04
2006-07
2003-04
2006-07
2003-04
2006-07
Occupation
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%

Managers & Administrators
12.7
21.8
15.4
23.5
9.6
16.8
15.2
24.6
17.9
24.4
Professionals
7.7
14.9
6.1
11.1
6.4
12.0
10.3
16.7
10.3
15.3
Associate Professionals
8.4
15.8
10.2
16.7
7.5
13.8
7.3
13.8
7.2
11.1
Tradespersons and Related Workers
6.9
23.1
18.2
34.5
6.4
19.2
6.4
15.5
3.8
8.3
Advanced Clerical & Service Workers
1.2
3.0
-
-
1.0
2.0
1.4
2.7
1.8
3.2
Intermediate Clerical, Sales & Service Workers
1.1
1.8
2.1
1.9
0.8
1.3
1.1
2.2
1.4
2.3
Intermediate Production & Transport Workers
8.5
24.5
22.2
43.5
6.8
19.9
7.6
16.6
4.4
8.8
Elementary Clerical, Sales & Service Workers
-
0.6
-
-
0.6
0.3
0.2
0.6
0.3
0.5
Labourers & Related Workers
2.5
9.8
3.6
5.4
1.5
5.2
1.7
4.3
1.1
2.2
Not Stated
5.8
12.2
9.1
16.5
4.7
9.8
4.1
8.2
4.1
6.9

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)


Table 8 shows that, when compared to Wage and salary earners across Australia, a higher proportion of people employed as Intermediate production and transport workers and Tradespersons in Western Australia receive average annual incomes greater than $83,200. The proportion was even higher for Wage and salary earners living in the South West SD, and especially in the SLAs of Mandurah and Collie. For example, almost 44% of people employed as Intermediate Production and Transport workers in Collie earned more than $83,200 in Wages and salaries in 2006-07 (this increased from 22% in 2003-04). Over 34% of Tradespersons in Collie also fell into this group (up from 18% in 2003-04). Although the proportions are not as high, a similar pattern can be also detected in the SLA of Mandurah. This is likely indicative of the high Wages and salaries offered to those working in the mining and resource sectors in many regions of Western Australia during this period.


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