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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 1996 to 2006  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/07/2007   
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Image: Australia - Includes: Population Change, Accuracy of Population Estimates, Capital City Growth, Growth along the Coast, Growth in Inland Regional Centres, Small Area Population Declines
MAIN FEATURES

POPULATION GROWTH IN STATES AND TERRITORIES
ACCURACY OF POPULATION ESTIMATES
CAPITAL CITY GROWTH
OUTER SUBURBAN GROWTH
INNER CITY GROWTH
STATE BALANCE POPULATION CHANGE
GROWTH ALONG THE COAST
STATISTICAL DISTRICTS OUTSIDE CAPITAL CITIES
GROWTH IN INLAND REGIONAL CENTRES
POPULATION DECLINES
POPULATION DENSITY
CENTRE OF POPULATION


SUMMARY COMMENTARY

POPULATION GROWTH IN STATES AND TERRITORIES

Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) at June 2006 was 20.7 million people. This represents an increase of 1.3 million people (or 6.6%) since June 2001, with an average annual growth rate of 1.3%. This increase was larger and occurred at a faster rate than the corresponding change in population between 1996 and 2001, when Australia gained 1.1 million people (6.0%) at an average growth rate of 1.2% per year.


All states and territories experienced population growth between June 2001 and June 2006.


The three most populous states recorded the largest population growth in the five-year period to June 2006. Queensland experienced the largest growth (462,600 people), followed by Victoria (323,600) and New South Wales (242,000). In the previous five-year period the largest gain in population was in New South Wales (370,500), followed by Queensland (290,300) and Victoria (244,600).


The fastest population growth in the five years to June 2006 was in Queensland, with the population increasing by 2.4% per year on average. Western Australia also experienced fast growth, recording an average population increase of 1.6% per year over the five years to 2006.


In the five years to June 2006, the remaining states and territories recorded annual growth rates equal to or lower than the average annual growth rate for Australia overall (1.3%). Victoria and the Northern Territory experienced the third fastest growth of all states and territories between June 2001 and June 2006, with an average annual growth rate equal to Australia's, at 1.3%. The Australian Capital Territory's population grew at a rate of 0.9% per year over the five years to June 2006, Tasmania recorded an increase of 0.8% per year and South Australia and New South Wales both increased at an average annual rate of 0.7%.


The growth rate during the five years to June 2006 was faster than the previous five-year period in all but two of the states and territories. The exceptions were the Northern Territory and New South Wales, which grew at a slower rate than in the earlier five years. Tasmania's population had decreased in the five years to June 2001 but increased in the five years to June 2006.


In each state and territory, the regions with the most prominent growth during the five years to June 2006 continued to be outer suburbs, inner areas of capital cities and some regional centres, particularly along the coast.

Population change, Australia - June 2001 to June 2006
Diagram: Population change, Australia—June 2001 to June 2006



Selected Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) are referred to in some of the following text and tables, particularly where Local Government Areas (LGAs) cover multiple SLAs, such as Brisbane (C) and Darwin (C), and in unincorporated areas within the Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory. Estimates of the resident population of all SLAs in Australia are available in spreadsheets accompanying this release on the ABS website <www.abs.gov.au>.ACCURACY OF POPULATION ESTIMATES

It is important to recognise that sub-state/territory population estimates in this publication and the accompanying spreadsheets are produced using 2006 census data and mathematical models and are subject to error. Caution should be exercised when using the estimates, especially for areas with very small populations. For more information see paragraphs 12 to 16 of the Explanatory Notes.CAPITAL CITY GROWTH

At 30 June 2006, capital city Statistical Divisions (SDs) were home to over 13.2 million people, making up almost two-thirds (64%) of Australia's population, the same proportion as in June 2001 and June 1996. The combined population of capital city SDs increased by 815,600 people in the five years to June 2006, accounting for 63% of Australia's total growth since June 2001.


Growth in the combined capital city SDs occurred at an average annual rate of 1.3% between 2001 and 2006, a slight increase compared with the previous five-year period, when the combined capital city SDs recorded an average growth rate of 1.2% per year.


In the five years to June 2006, Melbourne SD recorded the largest growth of all capital cities, increasing by 272,700 people. Brisbane SD recorded the second largest growth, increasing by 191,300 people, followed by Sydney SD (up 156,100) and Perth SD (up 126,500). In comparison, between June 1996 and June 2001, the capital city SD to record the largest growth was Sydney SD (up 247,100), followed by Melbourne SD (188,300), Brisbane SD (128,300) and Perth SD (97,900).


The fastest growing capital city between June 2001 and June 2006 was Brisbane SD, recording an average annual growth rate of 2.2%. The second fastest growing capital city SD was Perth SD, which increased at a rate of 1.8% per year, followed by Melbourne SD (1.5%). In contrast, during the previous five-year period, Darwin SD experienced the fastest growth of all capital city SDs, recording an average annual growth rate of 2.2%, followed by Brisbane SD (1.7%) and Perth SD (1.5%).

OUTER SUBURBAN GROWTH

Many LGAs on the outer borders of capital city SDs experienced strong growth during the five years to June 2006. Large growth was recorded in the Melbourne LGAs of Casey (C) (up 40,700 people), Wyndham (C) (up 28,900) and Melton (S) (up 28,100). Within Sydney SD, the LGAs experiencing the largest growth between 2001 to 2006 were Baulkham Hills (A) and Blacktown (C), increasing by 19,900 and 14,900 respectively. Within Brisbane SD, the outer suburban SLAs of Parkinson-Drewvale, Doolandella-Forest Lake and Wakerley all experienced significant growth.


In Perth, the city fringe LGA of Wanneroo (C) recorded the largest growth of all LGAs in Western Australia, increasing by 31,400 people over the five years to June 2006. The second largest growth was in Rockingham (C) (up 13,500 people), followed closely by Gosnells (C) and Swan (C).


In the smaller capital cities, many outer suburban areas also recorded strong growth. The outer Adelaide LGA of Salisbury (C) recorded the largest growth of all LGAs in South Australia in the five years to June 2006, while Port Adelaide Enfield (C), Onkaparinga (C) and Playford (C) also experienced large growth. The outer suburban LGA of Kingborough (M) experienced the largest growth of LGAs in Tasmania, while Palmerston (C), on the outskirts of Darwin, also recorded a large population increase over the five years to June 2006. The Canberra SLAs of Gungahlin, Dunlop and Amaroo, located on the northern fringes of the city, were among the strongest growing SLAs in the Australian Capital Territory.

INNER CITY GROWTH

Many inner city areas experienced rapid growth over the five-year period from June 2001 to June 2006. Perth (C) recorded the fastest growth rate of all LGAs in Australia, increasing at an average annual growth rate of 10.0%, up from 6.9% in the previous five-year period. The city LGAs of Melbourne (C) and Adelaide (C) also increased at a significant rate over the five years to June 2006, with the population of Melbourne (C) increasing by 8.6% on average each year (up from 5.0% in the previous five-year period) and Adelaide (C) increasing by 5.9% on average per year (up from 0.7%). Sydney (C) also experienced a fast annual growth rate between June 2001 and June 2006, increasing by 4.9% per year on average, up from 4.0% in the previous five-year period.


The Brisbane inner city SLAs of Bowen Hills (13.7% average annual growth), Fortitude Valley (12.5%) and Newstead (12.4%) all recorded rapid growth over the five years to June 2006. The Brisbane SLA of City - Remainder also had a large increase of 2,800 people between June 2001 and June 2006. The Darwin SLAs of City - Inner and Stuart Park both increased at a rapid rate of 5.0% per year over the five years to June 2006, while in Canberra, Braddon, in the inner north, increased at an average annual rate of 5.3%. Turner, also in the inner north, recorded a large increase of 1,300 people between June 2001 and June 2006.

STATE BALANCE POPULATION CHANGE

The combined population of the state balances (those areas outside capital city SDs) increased by 472,700 people during the five years to June 2006 to reach 7.53 million, making up 36% of Australia's population at June 2006. The population of the combined state balances grew by 1.3% per year on average in the five years to June 2006, which was slightly higher than the 1.1% average annual growth rate in the preceding five years.


Capital city growth outpaced growth in the state balances in all states and territories except Queensland and South Australia in the five years to June 2006, although the growth rate in the balance of New South Wales almost equalled that of Sydney SD.


In the five years to June 2006, as in the previous five-year period, the largest state balance growth occurred in the balance of Queensland, which increased by 271,300 people. This growth was over three times larger than that of the next largest state balance growth in New South Wales (85,900 people) and over five times larger than the third largest state balance growth in Victoria (50,800 people).

GROWTH ALONG THE COAST

Generally, the most prominent growth outside capital city SDs was recorded along the coast of Australia. In particular, many Queensland coastal LGAs experienced large growth between June 2001 and June 2006. The LGA of Gold Coast (C) experienced strong growth from June 1996 to June 2001 and from then until June 2006, recording the second largest growth of all LGAs in Australia for both five year periods (after Brisbane (C)). Other Queensland coastal LGAs to record large increases included Maroochy (S), Cairns (C) and Caloundra (C).


In Victoria, the coastal LGA of Greater Geelong (C), increased by 11,500 people (or 1.2% per year) over the five years to June 2006, making it the LGA with the largest growth outside of the Melbourne SD. This growth is consistent with the growth in Greater Geelong (C) during the previous five years (up 10,800 or 1.1% per annum).


The coastal LGAs in Western Australia continued to record strong growth during the five years to June 2006, particularly Mandurah (C), which increased by 9,600 people. Many other Western Australian coastal LGAs experienced strong growth during 2001 to 2006, including Busselton (S) and Capel (S) in the south-west of Western Australia and the mining area of Roebourne (S) in the Pilbara. In New South Wales, significant growth occurred in many coastal LGAs, including Tweed (A) (up 8,400), Newcastle (C) (7,000) and Hastings (A) (6,000).


The South Australian LGA of Alexandrina (DC) recorded relatively large and rapid growth during the five years to June 2006, increasing by 3,300, or 3.4% per year. Other South Australian LGAs along the coast to experience rapid growth included Victor Harbor (C) and Yankalilla (DC), which both recorded an average annual growth rate of 2.4%.


Although not strictly on the coast, the Statistical Districts of Rockhampton (Queensland) and Nowra-Bomaderry (located to the south of Wollongong in New South Wales) are within close proximity to the coast. Between June 2001 to June 2006 both areas experienced rapid growth, increasing at an average annual rate of 1.7% and 1.3% respectively.

STATISTICAL DISTRICTS OUTSIDE CAPITAL CITIES

Statistical Districts consist of selected, significant, predominantly urban areas in Australia which are not located within a capital city Statistical Division. In the five years to June 2006, the nine fastest-growing Statistical Districts were located on the coast of Australia and most of them were in Queensland. Hervey Bay increased at an average annual rate of 5.1% (up from 2.0% in the previous five-year period), Sunshine Coast increased by 3.8% per year and Mackay by 3.7% per year. The coastal region of Gold Coast-Tweed (located on the border of Queensland and New South Wales) increased by 3.6% per year. Other Queensland coastal regions to experience fast growth included Gladstone (3.2% per year) and Cairns (3.1% per year), while the Western Australian coastal Statistical Districts of Mandurah (3.5% per year) and Bunbury (2.9% per year) also experienced rapid growth over the five years to June 2006.GROWTH IN INLAND REGIONAL CENTRES

Inland regional centres continued to gain population in the five years to June 2006. The New South Wales LGAs of Maitland (C), Queanbeyan (C) and Wagga Wagga (C) all recorded large growth over the five years. Many inland LGAs in Victoria also experienced strong growth between June 2001 and June 2006, in particular, Greater Bendigo (C), Ballarat (C), Mitchell (S) and Macedon Ranges (S). Mount Barker (DC) and Light (RegC), located in South Australia, also recorded large growth.


Between June 2001 and June 2006, rapid growth occurred within the inland Statistical Districts of Toowoomba (Queensland) and Bendigo (Victoria), increasing by 2.2% and 1.3% per year respectively.

POPULATION DECLINES

As the population of a locality ages and households move through the life cycle, well-established areas can decline in population. For example, Campbelltown (C), in the Sydney SD, decreased by 3,000 people between June 2001 and June 2006. Several other LGAs with large population declines in the five years to June 2006 were located within the Sydney SD, including Fairfield (C), which decreased by 2,600 people, Ku-ring-gai (A), which decreased by 1,600 and Canterbury (C), which declined by 1,500 people. In contrast, Campbelltown (C) and Ku-ring-gai (A) recorded increases in population during the previous five-year period (June 1996 to June 2001).


Large population declines were also recorded within many state and territory balances (outside capital city SDs) between June 2001 and June 2006, especially in areas that have been affected by drought, for example the New South Wales LGAs of Moree Plains (A) and Walgett (A) declined by 1,700 and 1,100 people respectively.

POPULATION DENSITY

Australia's population density varies greatly, ranging from very low population density in remote areas, to very high population density in the inner city areas. Australia's population density at June 2006 was 2.7 people per square kilometre, compared with 2.5 in 2001 and 2.4 in 1996. The ACT had the highest population density of the states and territories in June 2006, as in June 2001, with 142 people per square kilometre, followed by Victoria with 23 and New South Wales with 9. The Northern Territory had a population density of only 0.2 people per square kilometre, the lowest of the states and territories.


Population density at June 2006 was highest in city centres, particularly in Sydney, where the three most densely populated SLAs in Australia were located. These were Sydney (C) - East (with 8,100 people per square kilometre); Sydney (C) - West (7,200); and Waverley (A) (6,900), which is just east of the city centre and includes the beach suburbs of Coogee, Bronte and Bondi Beach. Fourth on the list, and the most densely populated SLA in Victoria was Melbourne (C) - Inner (6,600) followed by Port Phillip (C) - St Kilda, which is on the shores of the bay just south of the city centre, with 6,000 people per square kilometre. The two most densely populated SLAs in Queensland were the inner Brisbane SLAs of New Farm and Kangaroo Point, which both had 5,700 people per square kilometre.


At June 2006, there were over 260 SLAs in Australia with less than 1 person per square kilometre. For information about the areas of SLAs see paragraph 29 of the Explanatory Notes.



CENTRE OF POPULATION

The centre of population is one measure to describe the spatial distribution of the population. This point marks the average latitude and longitude around which the population is distributed. The inherent imprecision in small area population estimates, and the use of geographic centroids, means the centre of population provides only an indication of the distribution of the population, and cannot with any certainty be ascribed to an exact location. See paragraphs 23 and 24 of the Explanatory Notes for more detail.


At June 2006 the centre of Australia's population was located around 54 kilometres east of the town of Ivanhoe in the western New South Wales LGA of Central Darling (A), reflecting the concentration of people in the south-east of Australia, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne. Between June 2001 and June 2006 the centre of population moved approximately 9 kilometres north, as a result of the relatively faster population growth in northern Australia, especially in south-east Queensland. In comparison, the centre of population moved 6 kilometres northward in the previous five-year period, moving the centre of population out of the Carrathool (A) and into Central Darling (A).

Centre of population, Australia - June 1996, 2001 and 2006
Diagram: Centre of population, Australia—June 1996, 2001 and 2006


ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION, States and territories - Capital city and balance of state/territory

ERP at 30 June
Change
1996
2001
2006p
1996-2001
2001-2006p
Part of state/territory
no.
no.
no.
no.
%(a)
no.
%(a)

New South Wales
Sydney SD
3 881 136
4 128 272
4 284 379
247 136
1.2
156 107
0.7
Balance of state
2 323 592
2 446 945
2 532 803
123 353
1.0
85 858
0.7
Total
6 204 728
6 575 217
6 817 182
370 489
1.2
241 965
0.7
Victoria
Melbourne SD
3 283 278
3 471 625
3 744 373
188 347
1.1
272 748
1.5
Balance of state
1 276 877
1 333 101
1 383 937
56 224
0.9
50 836
0.8
Total
4 560 155
4 804 726
5 128 310
244 571
1.1
323 584
1.3
Queensland
Brisbane SD
1 500 803
1 629 133
1 820 400
128 330
1.7
191 267
2.2
Balance of state
1 837 887
1 999 813
2 271 146
161 926
1.7
271 333
2.6
Total
3 338 690
3 628 946
4 091 546
290 256
1.7
462 600
2.4
South Australia
Adelaide SD
1 078 437
1 107 986
1 146 119
29 549
0.5
38 133
0.7
Balance of state
395 816
403 742
422 085
7 926
0.4
18 343
0.9
Total
1 474 253
1 511 728
1 568 204
37 475
0.5
56 476
0.7
Western Australia
Perth SD
1 295 092
1 393 002
1 519 510
97 910
1.5
126 508
1.8
Balance of state
470 164
508 157
539 535
37 993
1.6
31 378
1.2
Total
1 765 256
1 901 159
2 059 045
135 903
1.5
157 886
1.6
Tasmania
Hobart SD
195 718
197 282
205 566
1 564
0.2
8 284
0.8
Balance of state
278 725
274 513
284 356
-4 212
-0.3
9 843
0.7
Total
474 443
471 795
489 922
-2 648
-0.1
18 127
0.8
Northern Territory
Darwin SD
95 829
106 842
114 368
11 013
2.2
7 526
1.4
Balance of territory
86 014
90 926
96 306
4 912
1.1
5 380
1.2
Total
181 843
197 768
210 674
15 925
1.7
12 906
1.3
Australian Capital Territory
Canberra SD
307 917
318 939
333 940
11 022
0.7
15 001
0.9
Balance of territory
334
378
285
44
2.5
-93
-5.5
Total
308 251
319 317
334 225
11 066
0.7
14 908
0.9
Other Territories
3 095
2 584
2 380
-511
-3.5
-204
-1.6
Australia
Capital City
11 638 210
12 353 081
13 168 655
714 871
1.2
815 574
1.3
Balance of Australia(b)
6 672 504
7 060 159
7 532 833
387 655
1.1
472 674
1.3
Total
18 310 714
19 413 240
20 701 488
1 102 526
1.2
1 288 248
1.3

(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) Includes Other Territories.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREAS WITH LARGEST POPULATION CHANGES

ERP at 30 June
Change
1996
2001
2006p
1996-2001
2001-2006p
National
rank(b) LGA
Part of state/territory
no.
no.
no.
no.
%(a)
no.
%(a)

LARGEST INCREASES IN 2001-2006

1 Brisbane (C) Brisbane
824 489
896 649
992 176
72 160
1.7
95 527
2.0
2 Gold Coast (C) Qld Balance
356 441
423 719
507 439
67 278
3.5
83 720
3.7
3 Casey (C) Melbourne
148 957
181 562
222 236
32 605
4.0
40 674
4.1
4 Sydney (C) Sydney
106 573
129 696
164 547
23 123
4.0
34 851
4.9
5 Wanneroo (C) Perth
64 999
84 132
115 513
19 133
5.3
31 381
6.5
6 Wyndham (C) Melbourne
76 239
87 141
116 001
10 902
2.7
28 860
5.9
7 Melton (S) Melbourne
40 612
52 830
80 911
12 218
5.4
28 081
8.9
8 Melbourne (C) Melbourne
39 716
50 673
76 678
10 957
5.0
26 005
8.6
9 Maroochy (S) Qld Balance
108 072
127 202
152 664
19 130
3.3
25 462
3.7
10 Pine Rivers (S) Brisbane
106 277
122 303
144 860
16 026
2.8
22 557
3.4
11 Caboolture (S) Brisbane
100 757
114 338
135 359
13 581
2.6
21 021
3.4
12 Baulkham Hills (A) Sydney
125 598
146 045
165 931
20 447
3.1
19 886
2.6
13 Cairns (C) Qld Balance
111 469
117 629
136 558
6 160
1.1
18 929
3.0
14 Hume (C) Melbourne
120 819
135 986
153 729
15 167
2.4
17 743
2.5
15 Caloundra (C) Qld Balance
65 999
76 207
93 248
10 208
2.9
17 041
4.1
16 Ipswich (C) Brisbane
123 894
126 663
143 649
2 769
0.4
16 986
2.5
17 Blacktown (C) Sydney
239 818
264 799
279 759
24 981
2.0
14 960
1.1
18 Mackay (C) Qld Balance
71 448
75 993
90 303
4 545
1.2
14 310
3.5
19 Redland (S) Brisbane
103 082
117 252
131 332
14 170
2.6
14 080
2.3
20 Rockingham (C) Perth
61 631
74 018
87 541
12 387
3.7
13 523
3.4

LARGEST DECLINES IN 2001-2006

1 Campbelltown (C) Sydney
148 218
150 154
147 177
1 936
0.3
-2 977
-0.4
2 Fairfield (C) Sydney
189 108
189 034
186 414
-74
-
-2 620
-0.3
3 Moree Plains (A) NSW Balance
15 364
16 233
14 580
869
1.1
-1 653
-2.1
4 Ku-ring-gai (A) Sydney
105 392
107 655
106 029
2 263
0.4
-1 626
-0.3
5 Canterbury (C) Sydney
138 715
137 492
136 032
-1 223
-0.2
-1 460
-0.2
6 Marrickville (A) Sydney
79 876
76 743
75 525
-3 133
-0.8
-1 218
-0.3
7 Walgett (A) NSW Balance
8 289
8 328
7 199
39
0.1
-1 129
-2.9
8 Sutherland Shire (A) Sydney
203 753
213 828
212 813
10 075
1.0
-1 015
-0.1
9 Broken Hill (C) NSW Balance
21 986
21 098
20 139
-888
-0.8
-959
-0.9
10 Blue Mountains (C) Sydney
74 880
77 021
76 080
2 141
0.6
-941
-0.2
11 Narrabri (A) NSW Balance
14 328
14 537
13 680
209
0.3
-857
-1.2
12 Hawkesbury (C) Sydney
59 081
62 814
62 031
3 733
1.2
-783
-0.3
13 Derby-West Kimberley (S) WA Balance
6 512
8 287
7 511
1 775
4.9
-776
-1.9
14 Penrith (C) Sydney
167 868
177 413
176 661
9 545
1.1
-752
-0.1
15 Bourke (A) NSW Balance
3 974
3 951
3 217
-23
-0.1
-734
-4.0
16 Northern Grampians (S) Vic. Balance
13 292
13 055
12 330
-237
-0.4
-725
-1.1
17 Balonne (S) Qld Balance
4 825
5 580
4 936
755
3.0
-644
-2.4
18 Warrumbungle Shire (A) NSW Balance
10 832
10 849
10 208
17
-
-641
-1.2
19 Lachlan (A) NSW Balance
7 588
7 560
6 927
-28
-0.1
-633
-1.7
20 Deniliquin (A) NSW Balance
8 264
8 333
7 715
69
0.2
-618
-1.5

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) National rank based on population change between June 2001 and June 2006.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREAS WITH FASTEST POPULATION CHANGES

ERP at 30 June
Change
1996
2001
2006p
1996-2001
2001-2006p
National
rank(b) LGA
Part of state/territory
no.
no.
no.
no.
%(a)
no.
%(a)

FASTEST INCREASES IN 2001-2006

1 Perth (C) Perth
5 600
7 808
12 549
2 208
6.9
4 741
10.0
2 Melton (S) Melbourne
40 612
52 830
80 911
12 218
5.4
28 081
8.9
3 Melbourne (C) Melbourne
39 716
50 673
76 678
10 957
5.0
26 005
8.6
4 Capel (S) WA Balance
5 989
7 107
10 630
1 118
3.5
3 523
8.4
5 Weipa (T) Qld Balance
2 485
2 173
3 029
-312
-2.6
856
6.9
6 Wanneroo (C) Perth
64 999
84 132
115 513
19 133
5.3
31 381
6.5
7 Wyndham (C) Melbourne
76 239
87 141
116 001
10 902
2.7
28 860
5.9
8 Adelaide (C) Adelaide
12 831
13 289
17 723
458
0.7
4 434
5.9
9 Crow's Nest (S) Qld Balance
8 833
10 259
13 311
1 426
3.0
3 052
5.3
10 Nebo (S) Qld Balance
2 257
2 094
2 682
-163
-1.5
588
5.1
11 Sydney (C) Sydney
106 573
129 696
164 547
23 123
4.0
34 851
4.9
12 Hervey Bay (C) Qld Balance
38 809
43 298
55 113
4 489
2.2
11 815
4.9
13 East Pilbara (S) WA Balance
6 755
5 628
7 160
-1 127
-3.6
1 532
4.9
14 Chittering (S) WA Balance
2 409
2 936
3 683
527
4.0
747
4.6
15 Cardinia (S) Melbourne
42 716
47 010
58 559
4 294
1.9
11 549
4.5
16 Casey (C) Melbourne
148 957
181 562
222 236
32 605
4.0
40 674
4.1
17 Caloundra (C) Qld Balance
65 999
76 207
93 248
10 208
2.9
17 041
4.1
18 Light (RegC) SA Balance
9 524
10 542
12 846
1 018
2.1
2 304
4.0
19 Cambooya (S) Qld Balance
4 223
5 085
6 154
862
3.8
1 069
3.9
20 Miriam Vale (S) Qld Balance
3 975
4 484
5 408
509
2.4
924
3.8

FASTEST DECLINES IN 2001-2006

1 Bourke (A) NSW Balance
3 974
3 951
3 217
-23
-0.1
-734
-4.0
2 Central Darling (A) NSW Balance
2 473
2 451
2 008
-22
-0.2
-443
-3.9
3 Anangu Pitjantjatjara (AC) SA Balance
2 590
2 672
2 204
82
0.6
-468
-3.8
4 Coober Pedy (DC) SA Balance
2 668
2 424
1 996
-244
-1.9
-428
-3.8
5 Walgett (A) NSW Balance
8 289
8 328
7 199
39
0.1
-1 129
-2.9
6 Warren (A) NSW Balance
3 425
3 320
2 871
-105
-0.6
-449
-2.9
7 Carrathool (A) NSW Balance
3 200
3 316
2 911
116
0.7
-405
-2.6
8 Cloncurry (S) Qld Balance
3 193
3 827
3 362
634
3.7
-465
-2.6
9 Balonne (S) Qld Balance
4 825
5 580
4 936
755
3.0
-644
-2.4
10 Coonamble (A) NSW Balance
5 009
4 836
4 342
-173
-0.7
-494
-2.1
11 Moree Plains (A) NSW Balance
15 364
16 233
14 580
869
1.1
-1 653
-2.1
12 Carpentaria (S) Qld Balance
1 976
2 290
2 084
314
3.0
-206
-1.9
13 Derby-West Kimberley (S) WA Balance
6 512
8 287
7 511
1 775
4.9
-776
-1.9
14 Flinders (S) Qld Balance
2 234
2 090
1 907
-144
-1.3
-183
-1.8
15 Merredin (S) WA Balance
3 731
3 768
3 436
37
0.2
-332
-1.8
16 Balranald (A) NSW Balance
2 934
2 773
2 546
-161
-1.1
-227
-1.7
17 Lachlan (A) NSW Balance
7 588
7 560
6 927
-28
-0.1
-633
-1.7
18 Wakool (A) NSW Balance
4 935
4 929
4 530
-6
-
-399
-1.7
19 Carnarvon (S) WA Balance
6 385
6 723
6 159
338
1.0
-564
-1.7
20 Brewarrina (A) NSW Balance
2 234
2 165
1 998
-69
-0.6
-167
-1.6

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) National rank based on population change between June 2001 and June 2006, excluding LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2001.

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Commonwealth of Australia 2014

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