1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2009–10  
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Contents >> Education and training >> Participation in education

PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION

In May 2009, 2.9 million people aged 15-64 years applied to enrol in a course of study. Of these, 93% gained a place and were enrolled in a course of study (table 12.26).

12.26 PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION(a) - May 2009

Males
Females
Persons
'000
'000
'000

Applied to enrol
1 355.8
1 525.6
2 881.4
Studying
1 275.6
1 401.4
2 676.9
Gained placement but deferred study
47.6
82.9
130.5
Unable to gain placement
32.6
41.3
73.9

(a) Persons aged 15-64 years.
Source: ABS data available on request, 2009 Survey of Education and Work.


In the period 2004-09, the demand for enrolment in a course of study increased. For example, applications from people aged 20-24 years increased by 14% (graph 12.27). The number of 20-24 year olds studying increased by 15% over the same period and the number of 25-64 year olds studying increased by 12%.

12.27 DEMAND FOR EDUCATION, by age group
Graph: 12.27 DEMAND FOR EDUCATION, by age group


Many young people continue in full-time education immediately after completing compulsory schooling, either in post-compulsory schooling or in other forms of education, such as VET. In May 2009, 69% of 15-19 year olds were in full-time education (including 51% still at school). Some young people return to full-time study following a period of absence after completing compulsory schooling. In the 20-24 years age cohort, excluding persons still at school, 29% were undertaking full-time tertiary study and 11% were undertaking part-time tertiary study (table 12.28).

Many people aged 25 years and over return to study, to upgrade their skills or to gain new skills, often while employed. Some 6% of all persons aged 25-64 years in May 2009, were studying part-time at a tertiary institution, compared with 3% studying full-time.

12.28 EDUCATION PARTICIPATION RATES - May 2009

Age group (years)

15-19
20-24
25-64
%
%
%

Attending school
50.9
0.1
-
Attending tertiary(a)
Full time
18.4
29.2
2.5
Part time
7.7
10.7
6.0
Total
26.1
39.9
8.5
Attending
77.0
39.9
8.6
Not attending
23.0
60.1
91.4

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) Educational institutions other than schools.
Source: ABS data available on request, 2009 Survey of Education and Work.

Between 2004 and 2009, the enrolment of 20-24 year olds in tertiary study increased by 16%. The number of full-time participants in this age group increased by 80,600 (22%) compared with an increase in part-time participation of 2,400 (2%). Over the same period, there was a 10% growth in the number of 15-19 year old participants. While the number of 25-64 year old participants increased by 12% overall, full-time participation by this age group increased by 28%, whereas part-time participation increased by 6% (graph 12.29).

12.29 Participation in Tertiary Education, By age group
Graph: 12.29 Participation in Tertiary Education, By age group



Education and work

Graph 12.30 shows the labour force status of all students aged 15-64 years in May 2009. Labour force participation was lowest among those in Year 12 or below (40%) and greatest for those undertaking a Certificate III or IV (86%). Of the 1.6 million students who were employed in May 2009, some 41% were enrolled for a Bachelor degree or above.

12.30 Participation IN EDUCATION(a), By labour force status - May 2009
Graph: 12.30 Participation IN EDUCATION(a), By labour force status—May 2009


Among young people enrolled to study in May 2009, full-time employment was much higher among those aged 20-24 years than those aged 15-19 (22% compared with 8%). In both age groups, students who undertook part-time study were more frequently employed full-time than part-time.


Full-time participation

The 'full-time participation rate' describes the proportion of the population who are fully engaged in education or work or a combination of both. This includes: full-time education; full-time work; or both part-time education and part-time work. The full-time participation rate can be useful to determine the proportion of young people not fully engaged in education and/or work, and who might be at risk of future marginal participation in the labour market.

In May 2009, 224,200 (16%) young people aged 15-19 years and 336,600 (22%) 20-24 year olds were not full-time participants. Some 54,000 (4%) 15-19 year olds and 109,000 (7%) 20-24 year olds were neither enrolled to study nor in the labour force (table 12.31).

12.31 YOUTH PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION, By labour force status - May 2009

Enrolled in all study(a)

Full-time
Part-time
Total
Not enrolled
Total
'000
'000
'000
'000
'000

15-19 YEARS

In the labour force
Employed
Full-time
8.1
84.6
92.7
119.2
211.8
Part-time
378.5
15.2
393.7
91.9
485.6
Total
386.6
99.7
486.4
211.0
697.4
Unemployed
64.9
7.9
72.8
66.9
139.7
Not in the labour force
550.6
3.5
554.1
54.0
608.1
Total
1 002.1
111.2
1 113.3
331.9
1 445.2

20-24 YEARS

In the labour force
Employed
Full-time
17.4
113.5
130.9
586.6
717.6
Part-time
216.5
34.2
250.7
142.2
392.9
Total
233.9
147.7
381.6
728.9
1 110.5
Unemployed
31.6
7.7
39.3
71.0
110.3
Not in the labour force
176.2
6.6
182.9
109.0
291.8
Total
441.8
162.0
603.8
908.8
1 512.7

(a) All persons participating in education, including those whose study will not lead to a qualification.
Source: ABS data available on request, 2009 Survey of Education and Work.





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