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4102.0 - Australian Social Trends, 2004  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 15/06/2004   
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Contents >> Population

Population


    NATIONAL AND STATE SUMMARY TABLES

    POPULATION DATA SOURCES AND DEFINITIONS

    POPULATION GROWTH

    ECHOES OF THE BABY BOOM

    The baby boom occurred in the period from the end of World War II to the mid-1960s. A baby boom echo occurred in the early 1970s. This article examines whether a second baby boom echo will occur, by considering changes in the number of births and the total fertility rate in recent decades.


    POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS

    SEACHANGE - NEW RESIDENTS IN COASTAL AREAS

    This article examines the characteristics of people who moved into a high growth coastal area during the year prior to 7 August 2001. Although the common perception is of older people moving from capital cities, the article reports that almost four out of five (79%) of these new residents were aged under 50 years; and that not quite one-third had moved from a capital city.


    POPULATION PROJECTIONS

    SCENARIOS FOR AUSTRALIA'S AGEING POPULATION

    In 2002, people aged 65 years and over comprised 13% of Australia's population. By 2101, they are projected to comprise between 29% and 32% of the population. Over the same period, the proportion of children aged 0-14 years is projected to decline from 20% of the population, to between 12% and 15%. This article uses three population projection series to discuss the changing age structure of Australia's population. It also examines the impact of the differing assumptions which underpin each projection series.


    POPULATION DISTRIBUTION

    WHERE DO OVERSEAS-BORN PEOPLE LIVE?

    More than six million new settlers have arrived in Australia since the end of World War II. In 2001, people born overseas comprised almost one-quarter (23%) of the population. They were highly urbanised, with more than three-quarters (81%) living in a capital city and half living in Sydney or Melbourne. This article discusses the distribution of overseas-born people throughout Australia, in particular by age, country of birth and whether they are recent arrivals or longer term migrants.


This section contains the following subsection :
      National and state summary tables
      Population data sources and definitions
      Echoes of the baby boom
      Seachange - new coastal residents
      Scenarios for Australia's aging population
      Where do the overseas -born population live?

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