4510.0 - Recorded Crime - Victims, Australia, 2012 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 13/06/2013   
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Contents >> Victims of assault, states and territories >> Relationship of offender to victim

RELATIONSHIP OF OFFENDER TO VICTIM

In 2012, male victims of assault were more likely to identify the offender as a stranger, than female victims of assault, across all of the selected states and territories:

  • In New South Wales, 39% (14,844) of male victims of assault identified the offender as a stranger; compared to 14% (4,359) of female victims.
  • In South Australia, 49% (3,870) of male victims identified the offender as a stranger; compared to 16% (1,194) of female victims.
  • In the Northern Territory, 37% (932) of male victims identified the offender as a stranger; compared to 10% (447) of female victims.
  • In the Australian Capital Territory 42% (486) of male victims identified the offender as a stranger; compared to 16% (129) of female victims.

In 2012, female victims of assault were more likely to know the offender and were more likely to identify the offender as a family member:
  • In New South Wales, 49% (15,153) of female victims identified the offender as a family member; compared to 17% (6,500) of male victims.
  • In South Australia, 43% (3,098) of female victims identified the offender as a family member; compared to 13% (984) of male victims
  • In the Northern Territory, 62% (2,787) of female victims identified the offender as a family member; compared to 22% (559) of male victims; and
  • In the Australian Capital Territory, 41% (341) of female victims identified the offender as a family member; compared to 12% (138) of male victims.

Data relating to relationship of offender to victim are not available for Western Australia. For more information see Explanatory Notes paragraph 49.

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