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8155.0 - Australian Industry, 2010-11 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 22/06/2012   
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Contents >> Industry performance >> Industry analysis

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS

An analysis of performance by selected industries follows.


Agriculture, forestry and fishing

In 2010-11, Agriculture, forestry and fishing contributed 2.5% to each of total income, total expenses and IVA for Total selected industries.

Small businesses dominate Agriculture, forestry and fishing, contributing higher proportions of the industry's total income (79.7%), wages and salaries (66.5%) and employment (85.9%) than in any other industry.


Mining

The Mining industry was impacted in 2010-11 by high commodity prices; this was the primary driver of increases in most estimates for this industry.

Mining showed a $34.8b (69.6%) increase in OPBT. EBITDA increased $31.9b (54.8%) and IVA increased $38.3b (43.5%). When compared with Total selected industries, Mining had the highest percentage increase for OPBT, EBITDA and IVA.

Mining remains the largest contributor to OPBT (25.1%), EBITDA (23.8%) and IVA (13.6%) for all Total selected industries.

Depreciation and amortisation is a significant element of the cost structure of Mining, and represented 13.1% of its total expenses in 2010-11, the highest proportion of any selected industry.

In 2010-11, Mining had the highest capital expenditure ($57.1b), sales and service income per person employed ($1.2m) and profit margin (42.5%) of all the selected industries.


Manufacturing

Manufacturing accounted for 14.3% of total income for Total selected industries in 2010-11, the second largest contributor after Wholesale trade (15.5%).

Manufacturing experienced a reduction of 18,000 persons employed from approximately 954,000 in 2009-10 to 936,000 in 2010-11.


Electricity, gas, water and waste services

Large businesses dominate Electricity, gas, water and waste services, contributing more than 70% of its IVA, OPBT, and sales and service income.


Construction

In 2010-11 Construction showed a decrease of $1.2b in EBITDA (-3.8%). It ranked fourth in the movement of IVA, increasing $4.6b.

Construction recorded the second largest employment (1.1m) of Total selected industries, after Retail trade ($1.4m).


Wholesale trade

Wholesale trade was the largest contributor of all selected industries to total income (15.5%).

For purchases of goods and materials, Wholesale trade had the highest percentage contribution (28.3%) to Total selected industries.


Retail trade

Total income and total expenses in Retail trade increased by 2.9% and 2.0% respectively between 2009-10 and 2010-11.

With $368.9b, Retail trade recorded the third largest total income of Total selected industries, after Wholesale trade and Manufacturing.

Retail trade recorded the largest employment (1.4m) of any of the selected industries.


Accommodation and food services

In 2010-11 Accommodation and food services showed only a moderate increase in employment (2.3%). The industry has the lowest wages and salaries per person ($22,000).


Transport, postal and warehousing

The percentage of businesses in Transport, postal and warehousing that returned a profit was 82.3%, the highest proportion of any selected industry in 2010-11.


Information media and telecommunications

OPBT in Information media and telecommunications decreased $583m (-5.2%) between 2009-10 and 2010-11.

Large businesses dominate Information media and telecommunications, contributing more than 70% of its IVA, total income, total expenses, and wages and salaries.


Rental, hiring and real estate services

In absolute terms, Rental, hiring and real estate services ranked third in increased OPBT ($4.3b) between 2009-10 and 2010-11, with Mining ranked first ($34.8b) and Professional, scientific and technical services ranked second ($7.2b). Profit margin increased from 28.7% to 31.3% in this same period.

Rental, hiring and real estate services had the second highest capital expenditure of all Total selected industries at $33.4b, behind Mining ($57.1b).

In percentage terms, Rental, hiring and real estate services had the highest interest expenses of any industry, accounting for 18.8% of its total expenses.


Professional, scientific and technical services

Professional, scientific and technical services was the largest contributor of all selected industries to selected labour costs (12.8%).


Education and training (private)

In 2010-11, Education and training (private) received $11.2b of funding from government for operational costs which was 36.0% of total income. This was the second highest amount after Health care and social assistance (private) ($21.0b).

Of the selected industries, this industry had the highest ratio of wages and salaries to sales and service income (92.2%), significantly higher than the second ranked industry by this measure, Health care and social assistance (private) (56.0%).


Health care and social assistance (private)

Of the selected industries, Health care and social assistance (private) was by far the largest recipient of funding from government for operational costs. In 2010-11 it received $21.0b, or 42.6% of all such funding paid to Total selected industries. This funding represented 23.7% of the total income of the industry.


Other services

Small businesses accounted for 76.5% of OPBT in Other services, whereas IVA for small businesses accounted for 56.5% and medium sized businesses accounted for 29.1%.


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