8710.3.55.001 - Housing Motivations and Intentions, Queensland, 2004  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 19/05/2005   
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All other households


This category includes other related (eg cousins and grandparents) and unrelated (eg share-house) groups of people living as a household, also multi-family households.


Apartment


See Flat, unit or apartment.


Balance of Queensland major statistical region


Any area in Queensland outside the Brisbane metropolitan area. For more detail please refer to the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC), cat. no.1216.0.


Being purchased under a rent/buy or shared equity scheme


This category applies where households are both purchasing some equity in the dwelling, and paying rent for the remainder.


Brisbane major statistical region


Extends north to include Caboolture Shire, south to include Beaudesert Shire and Gold Coast City, and west to include Pine Rivers Shire and Ipswich City. For more detail please refer to the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC), cat. no.1216.0.


Change in family circumstances


This category includes changes such as being partnered, married, divorced or moving to live alone.


Couple only


This category refers to a couple family with no dependent nor non-dependent children present in the dwelling.


Couple with children


This category refers to a couple family who have children or other dependents present in the family.


Dwelling


A structure, or a discrete space within a structure, intended for people to live in or where a person or group of people live. A dwelling may include one or more rooms used as an office or workshop provided the dwelling is in residential use.


Dwelling modifications


For the purposes of this survey, data were collected on modifications to the current dwelling for the elderly (i.e. persons aged 65 years and over) or people with disabilities.


The types of modifications collected were:

  • ramps;
  • toilet, bath, laundry modifications;
  • door widened;
  • handgrab rails;
  • remote controls;
  • new or changed heating or air conditioning;
  • home automation system;
  • telemonitoring system;
  • structural changes.

Dwelling not suitable


This includes the size, condition and type of the dwelling not being suitable for households as well as physically hazardous conditions (e.g. the dwelling condition causing falls or other accidents).


Dwelling structure


This survey used the full classification set out in the Information Paper: Dwelling Structure Classification (DSC), 1992, cat. no. 1296.0. The dwelling structure types used in this publication are:

  • Separate house;
  • Semi-detached, row or terrace house, townhouse, etc;
  • Flat, unit or apartment; and
  • Caravan in caravan park, manufactured home;
  • Other dwellings (i.e. caravan not in a caravan park, houseboat not in a marina and house or flat attached to shop).

Employed


See Labour force status.


Flat, unit or apartment


This category includes all dwellings in blocks of flats, units or apartments. These dwellings do not have their own private grounds and usually share a common entrance foyer or stairwell. This category also includes flats that are attached to houses such as a granny flat and houses converted into two or more flats.


Household type


A household is a group of people who live together (in a single dwelling) as a single unit in the sense that they share common housekeeping arrangements. That is, the individuals residing in the same household share common facilities for the provision of food and other essentials.


A person, or persons, living in the same dwelling but having separate catering arrangements constitutes a separate household. It is therefore possible for a physical dwelling to contain more than one household as defined.


The categories used are;

  • Couple only (including de facto relationships);
  • Couple (including de facto relationships) and dependents (including children);
  • Single parent family;
  • Persons living alone;
  • All other households.

Labour force status


A classification of the civilian population aged 15 years and over into employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.


An employed household is defined as having at least one employed person living there.


Employed persons are aged 15 years and over who, during the reference week:

  • worked for one hour or more for pay, profit, commission or payment in kind, in a job or business or on a farm (comprising employees, employers and own account workers); or
  • worked for one hour or more without pay in a family business or on a farm (i.e. contributing family workers).

Employed are also defined as employees who had a job but were not at work and were:
  • away from work for less than four weeks up to the end of the reference week; or
  • away from work for more than four weeks up to the end of the reference week and received pay for some or all of the four week period to the end of the reference week; or
  • away from work as a standard work or shift arrangement; or
  • on strike or locked out; or
  • on workers’ compensation and expected to be returning to their job; or
  • were employers or own account workers, who had a job, business or farm, but were not at work.

An unemployed household is defined as having at least one unemployed person living there.


Unemployed persons are defined as those who had actively looked for full-time or part-time work at any time in the four weeks up to the end of the reference week and:

  • were available for work in the reference week; or
  • were waiting to start a new job within four weeks from the end of the reference week, and could have started in the reference week if the job had been available then.

A household not in the labour force is defined as having at least one person not in the labour force living there.


Persons not in the labour force are aged 15 years and over who were not employed or unemployed, as defined. They include persons who were keeping house (unpaid) and persons who are retired, voluntarily inactive, or permanently unable to work.


Landlord type


A landlord is defined as one who owns and leases land, buildings, etc. to another.


The categories used for the purposes of this survey are:

  • Real estate agent;
  • Public, community, co-operative housing (including the State or Territory housing authority);
  • Person not in the same household;
  • Other (including a parent or relative or other person).

Movers


Households where the current household members have moved together in the last three years.


Not in the labour force


See Labour force status.


Other dwellings


See Dwelling structure.


Other reasons not likely to move


This category includes other reasons for households not moving such as the current dwelling being close to health and community support services, schools or other educational institutions, public transport, family and friends or near a household member's place of work.


Other tenure type


This category applies to any tenure arrangements which did not fit other categories, including house-sitting or living in a dwelling rent-free.


Owner with a mortgage


This category applies to persons who are repaying a mortgage or loans secured against the dwelling, regardless of the purpose of the mortgage or secured loan.


Owner without a mortgage


This category applies to persons who are not making any payments on mortgages or loans secured against the dwelling.


Person living alone


This category refers to a single person household.


Personal safety at risk


This category includes any incident where a household member or neighbour felt unsafe or scared, also the perception that something may happen to put their safety at risk in either their home or its immediate vicinity.


Renter


This category applies to persons where money is exchanged to another person or organisation in return for lodging.


Semi-detached, row or terrace house, townhouse, etc.


A dwelling with its own private grounds and no dwelling above or below. A feature of this dwelling is that it is either attached in some structural way to one or more dwellings or is separated from neighbouring dwellings by less than one-half metre. Examples include semi-detached, duplexes, triplexes, row or terrace houses, townhouses and villa units. Multi-storey units or townhouses are separately identified from those which are single storeys.


Separate house


A house which stands alone in its own grounds separated from other dwellings by at least half a metre. A separate house may have a flat attached to it, such as a granny flat or converted garage (the flat is categorised under flat, unit or apartment- see above). The number of storeys of a separate house is not recorded.


Single parent family


This category refers to a family consisting of a lone parent with at least one dependent or non-dependent child (regardless of age) who is usually a resident in the family.


To live in a better area


This category includes lifestyle reasons, moving after retirement and moving to a safer or more attractive neighbourhood.


Tenure type


Tenure is the source of the legal right of a household to occupy a dwelling. For the purpose of this survey, households belong to one of these four occupancy categories:

  • Being paid off (see Owner with a mortgage)
  • Owned outright (see Owner without a mortgage)
  • Rented (See Renter)
  • Being purchased under a rent/buy or shared equity scheme
  • Other.

Unemployed


See Labour force status.


Unit


See Flat, unit or apartment.