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6342.0.80.002 - Flexible Working Arrangements in Queensland, Oct 2010 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 06/07/2011   
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CARING


INTRODUCTION

Why the information was collected

Questions on caring were included in this survey to assist in further developing the evidence base and help inform policies and practices with assisting certain groups; e.g. women and the disabled and elderly, to remain connected with the workforce while fulfilling caring and other responsibilities.


What information was collected?

Information was collected on whether informal or unpaid care was provided in the 12 months prior to October 2010 for any children, including members of a respondents own family or household, who were aged less than 15 years old (child care).

Information was also collected about whether people provided unpaid or informal care to anyone aged 15-64 years or 65 years and over in the 12 months prior to October 2010 (adult care). If they did provide care they were then asked if the person(s) they cared for had a long term-condition or disability that limited everyday activities or if they had an injury, sickness or short-term condition.

In both cases respondents were asked how often they provided this care in the 12 months prior to October 2010.


Who was asked?

All survey respondents were asked the questions on caring.


Where to find the information

Key findings about child care provided in this publication are for the aggregate 0-14 years age group. An additional breakdown of information is available in the accompanying data cubes for two age groups; those aged 0-3 years and those aged 4-14 years.

Key findings about adult care are provided in this publication for all persons aged 15 years and over. Additional information is provided in the accompanying data cubes for three groups; people aged 15-64 years old with a disability or long-term condition that limits everyday activities, people aged 15-64 years old with an injury, illness or short-term condition and people aged 65 years and over.

The underlying data, percentages and RSEs for the information presented in this publication can be found in the accompanying data cubes.


KEY FINDINGS

Child care

In the 12 months prior to October 2010, an estimated 40% of persons in Queensland within scope provided care for at least one child aged 0-14 years.


Child care and age

The age group with the highest proportion of people who provided care for children were aged 35-44 years (68%), followed by those aged 25-34 years (50%).

PROPORTION OF AGE GROUP WHO PROVIDED CARE FOR AT LEAST ONE CHILD, Aged 0-14 years - Queensland - 2010
Graph: PROPORTION OF AGE GROUP WHO PROVIDED CARE FOR AT LEAST ONE CHILD, Aged 0-14 years—Queensland—2010



Child care and sex

A significantly higher proportion of females provided care for children (47%) than males (33%).


Child care and marital status

A significantly higher proportion of married people provided care for children (51%) compared with people who were not married (23%).


Child care and household/family type

People in couple families with dependent children and/or dependent students had the highest proportion providing care for children (67%), followed by people in one parent households with dependent children and/or student (64%).


Child care and full-time/part-time employment type

Where part-time or full-time status could be established there was a significantly higher proportion of part-time workers who provided care for children (45%) than full-time workers (38%). People not in the labour force who were on long-term unpaid leave had the highest proportion of people who provided care for children (68%).


Child care and sector of employment

Where sector of employment could be established a higher proportion of people working in the government sector provided care for children aged 0-14 years (44%) than the private sector (38%). There were no significant differences in proportion of people who provided care for children 0-14 years between the commonwealth and state government levels of government with 44% of both commonwealth and state government employees caring for children.


Child care and industry

The industries with the highest proportion of people who provided care to children aged 0-14 years in the 12 months prior to October 2010 were mining (50%) and education and training (49%).

The industries with the lowest proportion of people who provided care to children were administration and support services (33%) and accommodation and food services (26%).


Child care and occupation

The occupations with the highest proportion of people who provided care to children aged 0-14 years in the 12 months prior to October 2010 were professionals (45%), clerical and administrative workers (44%), machinery operators and drivers (44%) and managers (43%). The occupation groups with the lowest proportion of people who provided care to children were and labourers (35%), technicians and trade workers (35%) and sales workers (34%).


Frequency of Child Care

Of the people who provided care for children aged 0-14 years in the 12 months prior to October 2010, an estimated 66% provided care on a daily basis.

There were only small differences between males and females in terms of distribution of how often each group cared for children aged 0-14 years. The only significant difference between the sexes was in the proportion that provided care at least once a week where males (19%) are significantly higher than females (13%).

FREQUENCY OF CHILD CARE, By sex - Queensland - 2010
Graph: FREQUENCY OF CHILD CARE, By sex—Queensland—2010


The age group 35-44 years had the highest proportion of people who provided care every day to children aged 0-14 years (84%), followed by the age group 25-34 years (79%). While the age group 65 years and over had the lowest proportion of people who provided care every day (6%), it was the age group with the highest proportion of people who provided care at least once a week (52%).


Child care and flexible working arrangements

People who provided care for at least one child aged 0-14 years had a significantly higher use of flexible working arrangements than people who did not care for any children. Of the people who provided care for at least one child aged 0-14 years in the 12 months prior to October 2010, 67% used at least one flexible working arrangement. In comparison, 52% of people who did not provide care for any children used at least one flexible working arrangement.

It is notable that the proportion of people providing care who used flexible working arrangements varied very little between those who cared for at least one child aged 0-3 (68%), those who cared for at least one child aged 4-14 years (67%) and those who cared for children in both age groups (67%).

PROPORTION OF CARERS WHO USED FLEXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTS, By type of care - Queensland - 2010
Graph: PROPORTION OF CARERS WHO USED FLEXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTS, By type of care—Queensland—2010


The most prevalent flexible working arrangement used by people who provided care for at least one child aged 0-14 years was choosing when to take annual leave (56%). People who provided care for at least one child aged 0-14 years were also comparatively more frequent users of flextime.

PROPORTION WHO CARED/DID NOT CARE FOR CHILDREN, By flexible working arrangements used - Queensland - 2010
Graph: PROPORTION WHO CARED/DID NOT CARE FOR CHILDREN, By flexible working arrangements used—Queensland—2010



ADULT CARE

In the 12 months prior to October 2010, an estimated 19% of persons in Queensland within scope provided care for at least one person aged 15 years and over. An estimated 53% of the people surveyed provided care for at least one person aged 15 years and over and at least one child aged 0-14 years.


Adult care and age

The age group with the highest proportion of people who provided adult care was the 45-54 years age group (35%), followed by the 55-64 years age group (24%).


Adult care and sex

A significantly higher proportion of females provided adult care (23%) than males (15%).


Adult care and marital status

A significantly higher proportion of married people provided care for adults (22%) compared with people who were not married (14%).


Adult care and household/family type

Couple families and one parent families generally show similar rates of adult care. For example, 39% of couple families with children aged 0-14 years and dependent students cared for an adult and 40% of one parent families with children aged 0-14 years and dependent students.


Adult care and full-time/part-time employment type

Where part-time or full-time status could be established there was no significant difference between the proportion of part-time workers who provided care for an adult aged 15 years and over (19%) and full-time workers (18%).

People not in the labour force who were on long-term unpaid leave had the highest proportion of people who provided care for adults (22%).


Adult care and sector of employment

Where sector of employment could be established the government sector (23%) showed a significantly higher proportion of people who provided care for adults aged 15 years and over than the private sector (16%). Significantly more commonwealth employees (36%) cared for an adult than their state (22%) and local (21%) government colleagues.


Adult care and industry

The industries with the highest proportion of employees who provided care to adults aged 15 years and over in the 12 months prior to October 2010 were education and training (27%), public administration and safety (24%) and health care and social assistance (23%). The industries with the lowest proportion of people who provided care to adults were construction (14%), wholesale trade (15%), accommodation and food services (12%) and mining (10%).


Adult care and occupation

The occupations with the highest proportion of people who provided care to adults aged 15 years and over in the 12 months prior to October 2010 were clerical and administrative workers (22%), managers (22%) and professionals (21%). The occupation with the lowest proportion of people who provided care to adults were sales workers (14%) and technicians and trade workers (14%).


Frequency of adult care

Of the people who provided adult care in the 12 months prior to October 2010, an estimated 53% provided care on a daily basis. A further 21% of people who provided adult care did so at least once a week. The age group 45-54 years had the highest proportion of people who provided adult care every day (62%), closely followed by the age group 35-44 years (61%).

PROPORTION OF CARERS BY AGE GROUP WHO PROVIDED DAILY CARE TO PERSONS AGED 15 YEARS AND OVER, Queensland - 2010
Graph: PROPORTION OF CARERS BY AGE GROUP WHO PROVIDED DAILY CARE TO PERSONS AGED 15 YEARS AND OVER, Queensland—2010


Of the people who provided care for at least one person aged 15-64 years only, 70% provided care every day. This was the highest proportion of daily care for any of the three types of adult care.

HOW OFTEN PROVIDED CARE FOR PEOPLE AGED 15 YEARS AND OVER, By type of care - Queensland - 2010
Graph: HOW OFTEN PROVIDED CARE FOR PEOPLE AGED 15 YEARS AND OVER, By type of care—Queensland—2010



Adult care and flexible working arrangements

People who provided care for at least one person aged 15 years and over had a significantly higher use of at least one flexible working arrangement (66%) than people who did not provide care for any adult (56%).

The proportion of people who cared for at least one person aged 15-64 years and at least one person 65 years and over who had used at least one flexible working arrangement (74%), was significantly higher than those who did not provide any care for adults aged 15 years and over (56%).

USE OF FLEXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTS, By type of adult care - Queensland - 2010
Graph: USE OF FLEXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTS, By type of adult care—Queensland—2010



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