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4725.0 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing: A focus on children and youth, Apr 2011  
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GLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Aboriginal people

People who identify or are identified as being of Aboriginal origin. May also include people identified as being of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin. See also 'Torres Strait Islander people'.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander household

A household in an occupied private dwelling with at least one resident who has been identified as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin. Other residents of the household may have been identified as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin, non-Indigenous, or have Indigenous status unknown. See also 'Household'.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages are those languages classified in the Australian Indigenous Languages group of the Australian Standard Classification of Languages. They exclude Oceanian Pidgins and Creoles and ‘Aboriginal English’. See also 'Main language spoken at home'.

Access to services

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, people aged 15 years and over were asked if they found it hard to get to, or had any other problems with accessing one or more of the following services:

  • Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander health workers
  • Dentists
  • Doctors
  • Other health workers
  • Hospitals
  • Legal services
  • Employment services
  • Phone companies
  • Centrelink
  • Banks and other financial places
  • Medicare
  • Mental health services
  • Other services (not further defined)

Age-specific death rate

For this publication, the age-specific death rate is the number of deaths (occurred or registered) during the calendar year in a specified age group, per 100,000 of the estimated resident population of the same age at the mid-point of the year (30 June), except age 0 where the rate is per 1,000 live births.

Attended a cultural event

Participation in traditional or contemporary Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander cultural activities and events in the 12 months prior to 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey interview. Events include: Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander ceremonies, NAIDOC week activities, sports carnivals, festivals or carnivals involving arts, craft, music or dance, funerals/sorry business, and involvement with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander organisations.

Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) Remoteness Structure

Within the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC), the Remoteness classification comprises five categories. Determined in the context of Australia as a whole, each of these identify an aggregation of non-contiguous geographical areas, being a grouping of Collection Districts (CDs), which share a particular degree of remoteness. The degrees of remoteness range from 'highly accessible' (i.e. major cities) to 'very remote'. The degree of remoteness of each CD was determined using the Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA). ARIA measures the remoteness of a point based on the physical road distances to the nearest Urban Centre in each of the five size classes. Therefore, not all states and territories have areas that are classified in all the Remoteness classifications. There are six Remoteness Areas in this structure: Major Cities of Australia, Inner Regional Australia, Outer Regional Australia, Remote Australia, Very Remote Australia and Migratory (composed of offshore, shipping and migratory CDs). For more information, see Statistical Geography Volume 1, Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC), 2007 (cat. no. 1216.0).


B

Barriers to accessing services
People aged 15 years and over that reported difficulties accessing one or more services were asked to identify which of the following were barriers:
  • Transport/distance
  • Cost of service
  • No services in area
  • Not enough services in area
  • Waiting time too long or [service] not available at time required
  • Services not culturally appropriate
  • Don't trust services
  • Treated badly/discrimination
  • Other not further defined


Binge drinking

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (NATSISS), acute (or short-term) alcohol consumption risk was based on the largest quantity of alcohol consumed in a single day during the fortnight prior to interview. Relative acute risk levels as defined by the National Health and Medical Research Council in 2001 are as follows:

MINIMISING RISK IN THE SHORT TERM
Level of risk
Males
Females
Low risk
up to 6 standard drinks(a)
up to 4 standard drinks(a)
Risky
7–10 standard drinks(a)
5–6 standard drinks(a)
High risk
11 or more standard drinks(a)
7 or more standard drinks(a)

One standard drink contains 12.5ml of alcohol
It should be noted that the acute measure of alcohol consumption in the NATSISS did not take into account whether the largest quantity of alcohol consumed in a single day during the previous fortnight was more, less, or the same as usual. See also 'Long-term alcohol consumption risk level'.

C

Canadian National Occupancy Standard for housing appropriateness

A standard measure of housing utilisation that is sensitive to both household size and composition. Based on the following criteria used to assess bedroom requirements, households requiring at least one additional bedroom are considered to be overcrowded:
  • there should be no more than two persons per bedroom
  • a household of one unattached individual may reasonably occupy a bed-sit (i.e. have no bedroom)
  • couples and parents should have a separate bedroom
  • children less than five years of age, of different sexes, may reasonably share a room
  • children five years of age or over, of different sexes, should not share a bedroom
  • children less than 18 years of age and of the same sex may reasonably share a bedroom, and
  • single household members aged 18 years or over should have a separate bedroom.


Census

A census is a count of a whole population. The Census of Population and Housing measures the number of people in Australia and their key characteristics, at a given point in time. The ABS conducts the Census every five years, the last was in August 2006. In this publication the word ‘Census’ refers to the ABS Census of Population and Housing.

Clerical and administrative workers

Clerical and administrative workers provide support to Managers, Professionals and organisations by organising, storing, manipulating and retrieving information. For detailed information, see Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), First Edition, 2006 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Community and personal service workers

Community and personal service workers assist Health Professionals in the provision of patient care, provide information and support on a range of social welfare matters, and provide other services in the areas of aged care and child care, education support, hospitality, defence, policing and emergency services, security, travel and tourism, fitness, sports and personal services. For detailed information, see Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), First Edition, 2006 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Cultural activities

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, types of selected cultural activities included: fishing, hunting, gathering wild plants/berries, making Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander arts or crafts, performing any Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander music, dance or theatre, writing or telling any Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander stories, and none of the above.

Cultural events

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, people aged 3 years and over were asked whether they had been involved in the following types of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander cultural events or activities in the 12 months prior to interview, including:
  • ceremonies
  • NAIDOC week activities
  • sports carnivals (excluding NAIDOC week activities)
  • festivals or carnivals involving arts, craft, music or dance (excluding NAIDOC week activities)
  • been involved with any Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander organisations
  • funerals/Sorry Business.

Note that for children aged 3–14 years, responses were provided by a proxy.

Cultural group

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, a 'cultural group' refers to a tribal or language group, a clan, a mission or a regional group. Identifying with a cultural group means that an individual shares a common language and/or clan or tribal membership with that group.

Cultural responsibilities

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, cultural responsibilities refer to responsibilities that people have outside of work, even if their work is for a cultural organisation. Cultural responsibilities can include:
  • telling traditional stories
  • being involved in ceremonies, and
  • attending events, such as funerals or festivals.
D

Death rate

See 'Age-specific death rate'.

Disability or long-term health condition

A limitation, restriction, impairment, disease or disorder, that has lasted, or is expected to last for six months or more, and restricts everyday activities. The 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey collected information on the following types of restrictions related to disability or long-term health conditions:
  • Sight problems (not corrected by glasses or contact lenses)
  • Hearing problems
  • Speech problems
  • Blackouts, fits or loss of consciousness
  • Difficulty learning or understanding things
  • Limited use of arms or fingers
  • Difficulty gripping things
  • Limited use of legs or feet
  • Any condition that restricts physical activity or physical work (e.g. back problems, migraines)
  • Any disfigurement or deformity
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Chronic or recurring pain
  • A nervous or emotional condition
  • Long term effects as a result of head injury, stroke or other brain damage
  • Any other long term condition that requires treatment or medication
  • Any other long term condition such as arthritis, asthma, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease or dementia.
Discrimination

Situations and/or places in which a person was treated unfairly. Includes, but is not limited to: being treated rudely, as if they are inferior or with disrespect, ignored, insulted, harassed, stereotyped or discriminated against, or unfair assumptions are made about them. Refers only to those situations and/or places in which the person was treated unfairly because of their Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin.


E

Employed

Persons aged 15 years or over who had a job or business, or who undertook work without pay in a family business, for a minimum of one hour, in the previous week. Includes persons who were absent from a job or business and CDEP participants.

Estimated resident Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population


The estimated resident Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is based on the Census count and adjusted for instances in which Indigenous status is unknown and for net undercount. These adjustments are necessary because of the volatility of counts of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population between censuses. The estimated resident Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is compiled for 30 June each census year, and is not updated between censuses. However, experimental Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population estimates have been produced for the period 1986 to 2006 and experimental Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population projections for the period 2007 to 2021.

Estimated resident population (ERP)


The official ABS estimate of the Australian population, based on the Census count (on a usual residence basis). The estimated resident population is compiled at 30 June each census year, and is updated quarterly between censuses. These intercensal estimates of the resident population are revised each time a population census is taken. See also 'Estimated resident Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population'.

F

Fertility rates

Also referred to as birth rates. Refers to age-specific fertility rates, which are the number of live births (occurred or registered) during the calendar year, according to the age of the mother, per 1,000 of the female estimated resident population of the same age at 30 June. See also 'Total fertility rate (TFR)' and 'Teenage fertility rate'.

Formal child care
Formal child care is regulated care away from the child's home, which parents/guardians normally must pay for. Types of formal care include: before and/or after school care, long day care, family day care, and occasional care.
G

Gross weekly personal income

The sum of the income from all sources received by the individual each week before income tax and the Medicare levy have been deducted. Sources include wages and salaries and other receipts from employment; CDEP; profit/loss from own unincorporated business; property (rental income); government pensions and allowances; and private transfers.


H

Health status

See 'Self-assessed health status'.

Help (or support) given to others

Respondents aged 15 years and over were asked if they helped anyone who does not live with them with any of the following activities, in the four weeks prior to interview. Response categories included:
  • domestic work, home maintenance or gardening (non-remote)/helped around the home or garden (remote),
  • providing transport or running errands (non-remote)/provided transport or went out and got things for them (remote),
  • any unpaid child care,
  • any teaching, coaching or practical advice,
  • providing any emotional support, or
  • any other help.

More than one response was allowed. They may have also said that they did not help anyone. People who had helped someone with one or more of these activities were asked who it was they helped, based on the following:
  • relative in another house,
  • friend,
  • neighbour,
  • work colleagues, or
  • other person.

Homelands/traditional country


An area of land with which Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people have ancestral and/or cultural links.

Home owner

See 'Owner without a mortgage' and 'Owner with a mortgage'.

Household


A household is defined as a group of two or more related or unrelated people who usually reside in the same dwelling, who regard themselves as a household, and who make common provision for food or other essentials for living, or a person living in a dwelling who makes provisions for his/her own food and other essentials for living, without combining with any other person (i.e. a lone-person household). See also 'Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander household'.


I

Illicit substance use

The use of substances for non-medical purposes. Substances covered in the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey included analgesics, tranquillisers, amphetamines, marijuana, heroin, methadone, cocaine, hallucinogens (both synthetic and naturally occurring), ecstasy or other designer drugs, petrol and other inhalants, and kava. Information on substance use was collected for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years or over in non-remote areas via a self-completion form, and in remote areas via Computer Assisted Interviewing.

Indigenous housing organisation


Any Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander organisation which is responsible for managing housing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This includes community organisations, such as Resources Agencies and Land Councils, that have a range of functions, provided that they manage housing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Indigenous Regions

Indigenous Regions (IREGs) are the highest level of the Australian Indigenous Geographic Classification (AIGC). The AIGC provides a geographical standard for the publication of Census data about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population of Australia. In 2001, the highest level of the AIGC was Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) Regions, which reflected the legal ATSIC Region boundaries defined under the ATSIC Act (1989). When ATSIC ceased operations in 2005, the legal requirement for these boundaries also ceased to exist. IREGs are based on the former ATSIC Region boundaries but reflect recent changes in local government areas. Changes in government administrative arrangements were also taken into account in defining the IREGs. Where possible and appropriate, the 2001 boundaries were maintained to allow the characteristics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people within a Region to be compared across Censuses. For more information, see Maps and Census Profiles, Australian Indigenous Geographic Classification, 2006 (cat. no. 4706.0.30.001).


J

K

Kessler Psychological Distress Scale

A modified five-question version of the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale - 10 (K10) used to provide a measure of the social and emotional wellbeing of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, respondents aged 15 years or over were asked to indicate how often, over the previous four weeks, they had felt: nervous, without hope, restless or jumpy, that everything was an effort, and so sad that nothing could cheer them up. Based on their responses to these questions, respondents were attributed an overall score in the range 5–25. A high score (in the range 12–25) indicates that the person may be experiencing feelings of anxiety or depression on a regular basis, whereas a low score (in the range 5–11) indicates that the person is experiencing these feelings less frequently, or not at all.


L

Labourers
Labourers perform a variety of routine and repetitive physical tasks using hand and power tools, and machines either as individual or as part of a team assisting more skilled workers such as Trades Workers, and Machinery Operators and Drivers. For detailed information, see Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), First Edition, 2006 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Labour force status

Identifies whether a person is employed, unemployed or not in the labour force. See also 'Employed', 'Not in the labour force' and 'Unemployed'.

Labour force participation rate

The number of persons in the labour force (that is, employed and unemployed) expressed as a percentage of the population.

Long-term alcohol consumption risk level

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, chronic alcohol consumption risk was based on a person's reported usual daily consumption of alcohol and the frequency of consumption in the previous 12 months. Relative chronic risk levels as defined by the National Health and Medical Research Council in 2001 are as follows:

MINIMISING RISK IN THE LONGER TERM, consumption on an average day
Level of risk
Males
Females
Low risk
up to 4 standard drinks(a)
up to 2 standard drinks(a)
Risky
5–6 standard drinks(a)
3–4 standard drinks(a)
High risk
7 or more standard drinks(a)
5 or more standard drinks(a)

Note: One standard drink contains 12.5ml of alcohol
Also see 'Binge drinking'.
M

Main Carer

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, the child's main carer was considered to be their mother/step-mother or father/step-father, except where neither of these lived in the household with the child. If a child did not live with their parents or step-parents, the child's proxy was asked whether they looked after the child the most. If not, the child's proxy was asked to nominate who in the household looks after the child the most. The response was based on a list of people aged 12 years and over who were identified as usual residents of the household. An 'other person' who lived in the household, but was not identified in the basic household demographic information, was also able to be specified.

Main language spoken at home

The language a person most commonly uses at home.

Major cities


Geographical areas within the 'Major cities of Australia' category of the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) Remoteness Structure.

Median

The midpoint of a distribution of values. Half the values occur above this point and half below.

Multiple family household

In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey the family composition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander households was determined for all persons who usually lived in, and the relationship between the persons within, the households. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander households with young people or children can be classified into four broad groups:
  • Couple parent family households
  • One parent family households
  • Multiple family households
  • Other one family households.

A family is defined in the ABS as two or more persons, one of whom is at least 15 years of age, who are related by blood, marriage (registered or de facto), adoption, step or fostering, and who are usually resident in the same household. The basis of a family is formed by identifying the presence of a couple relationship, lone parent-child relationship or other blood relationship. Some households will, therefore, contain more than one family (a multiple family household). See Family, Household and Income Unit Variables 2005 (cat. no. 1286.0) for more detailed information on family definitions.


N

NAIDOC

NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. NAIDOC Week occurs in the first full week of July.

Neighbourhood/community problems

A person’s perception of crime and other problems in their neighbourhood. Problems include: theft, prowlers or loiterers, damage to property, dangerous or noisy driving, alcohol and illegal drugs, family violence, assault, sexual assault, problems with neighbours, youth-related problems and a perceived lack of personal safety.

Non-remote areas


Geographical areas within the 'Major Cities of Australia', 'Inner Regional Australia' and 'Outer Regional Australia' categories of the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) Remoteness Structure.

Non-school qualification

A non-school qualification is awarded for post-school educational attainment. Includes Certificates, Diplomas, Bachelor degrees, Graduate certificates, Graduate diplomas and Postgraduate degrees. Non-school qualifications may be attained concurrently with school qualifications. Responses have been coded according to the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0).

Not in the labour force


Persons who are retired, no longer working, do not intend to work in the future, permanently unable to work, or who have never worked and never intend to work. See also 'Labour force status'.


O

Occupation

An occupation is a collection of jobs that are quite similar in their title and tasks, skill level and skill specialisation. The major groups of occupation classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), 2006, are:
  • Managers
  • Professionals
  • Technicians and trades workers
  • Community and personal service workers
  • Clerical and administrative workers
  • Sales workers
  • Machinery operators and drivers
  • Labourers.

For detailed information, see Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), First Edition, 2006 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Organised sport

Children were considered to have participated in organised sport if they had played or trained in any sport, organised through either a club or school in the 12 months prior to interview. If the child was currently at school, then this activity was specified as being undertaken outside school hours.

Overcrowding

See 'Canadian National Occupancy Standard for housing appropriateness'.

Owner with a mortgage


A household where the reference person's outstanding mortgage or loan amount secured against the dwelling is greater than zero. Persons who have an outstanding mortgage amount but who are not making any payments are included in this category. See also 'Tenure type'.

Owner without a mortgage


A household where the reference person has no outstanding mortgage or loan amount secured against the dwelling. Persons who have repaid a mortgage or loan but have not formally discharged the associated mortgage are included in this category. See also 'Tenure type'.


P

Parent or guardian

A derived measure which broadly defines parent-child relationships in households. It includes only Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who are the assumed parents or guardians of one or more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in the same household. In some cases, the person identified as being a parent or guardian will be an actual parent of the child, but if the child does not live with their parents then the parent relationship assigned may relate to a guardian, grandparent or other relative living in the household. The assumed parent or guardian population excludes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with non-Indigenous parents, guardians or carers and Indigenous parents under 15 years. See the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey: Users' Guide, 2008 (cat. no. 4720.0) for more information about the assumed parent or guardian measure.

Personal stressors

One or more selected events or circumstances personally experienced by the respondent in the last 12 months. In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, the specified stressors were: serious illness or disability, serious accident, death of a family member or close friend, divorce or separation, inability to obtain work, involuntary loss of a job, alcohol-related problems, drug-related problems, witnessing violence, being the victim of abuse or violent crime, trouble with the police, gambling problems, incarceration of self or a family member, overcrowding at home and discrimination or racism.

Permanent work

Work that is ongoing.

Private and other renters (privately rented)

Comprises renters from a real estate agent, relative or other person not in same household, residential park (includes caravan parks and marinas), government or other employer, housing cooperative or church group, and landlord not stated. See also 'Tenure type'.

Professionals

Professionals perform analytical, conceptual and creative tasks through the application of theoretical knowledge and experience in the fields of the arts, media, business, design, engineering, the physical and life sciences, transport, education, health, information and communication technology, the law, social sciences and social welfare. For detailed information, see Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), First Edition, 2006 (cat. no. 1220.0).


Psychological distress

See 'Kessler Psychological Distress Scale'


Q


R

Regional areas

Geographical areas within the 'Inner Regional Australia' and 'Outer Regional Australia' categories of the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) Remoteness Structure.

Remote areas

Geographical areas within the 'Remote Australia' and 'Very Remote Australia' categories of the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) Remoteness Structure.

Removal from natural family

A person that has been 'taken away' from their natural family as a child. This includes removal from family by welfare, as part of government policy, or being taken away to a mission. Removal from natural family excludes people who were separated for reasons other than government policy, such as traditional adoption and family separation, as well as those removed from family for less than 6 months.


S


Sales workers

Sales workers sell goods, services and property, and provide sales support in areas such as operating cash registers and displaying and demonstrating goods. For detailed information, see Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), First Edition, 2006 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Self-assessed health status

A person’s general assessment of their own health against a five point scale which ranged from excellent through to poor.

Smoker status


The extent to which an adult was smoking at the time of the interview. In the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, smoker status was collected from persons aged 15 years or over and referred to regular smoking of tobacco, including manufactured (packet) cigarettes, roll-your-own cigarettes, cigars and pipes, but excluding chewing tobacco and smoking of non-tobacco products. Categories used to describe smoker status are as follows:
  • Current daily smoker: a person who was smoking one or more cigarettes (or cigars or pipes) per day, on average, at the time of interview
  • Current smoker: a person who was smoking at least once a week, but not daily at the time of the interview
  • Ex-smoker: a person who has previously smoked daily or has smoked 100 or more cigarettes in lifetime or has smoked pipes/cigars etc. at least 20 times
  • Never smoked: a person who has not previously smoked daily or smoked 100 or more cigarettes in lifetime or smoked pipes/cigars etc. at least 20 times.

Sporting activities

Comprises the following activities:
  • Coach, instructor or teacher
  • Referee, umpire or official
  • Committee member or administrator
  • Took part in sport or physical activities
  • Attended sporting event as a spectator
  • Other sporting activity not further defined.

Stressors

See Personal stressors

Support given to relatives outside the household

Respondents aged 15 years and over were asked if they provided any help or support to relatives who did not live with them. Response categories included:
  • money to help pay rent, bond, or other housing costs
  • providing or paying for food or clothing
  • loaning them a car or driving them places
  • paying for education, schooling costs or textbooks
  • giving them spending money
  • giving them money to pay bills, meet debt or buy big cost items
  • child support payments
  • other support not previously mentioned.

T

Technicians and trades workers

Technicians and trades workers perform a variety of skilled tasks, applying broad or in-depth technical, trade or industry specific knowledge, often in support of scientific, engineering, building and manufacturing activities. For detailed information, see Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), First Edition, 2006 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Teenage fertility rate

The number of births during the calendar year to women aged 15–19 years, per 1,000 of the female estimated resident population aged 15–19 years at 30 June of the same year. Births to women aged under 15 years are included.

Temporary work

Work that has a set time, for example a fixed term or seasonal contract.

Tenure type

The nature of a household’s legal right to occupy the dwelling in which they usually reside. Includes home purchasing, renting, rent/buy or shared equity schemes and other tenure types. See also 'Private and other renters'.

Torres Strait Islander people

People identified as being of Torres Strait Islander origin. May also include people identified as being of both Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal origin. See also 'Aboriginal people'.

Total fertility rate (TFR)

Represents the number of children a woman would have during her lifetime if she were to experience current age-specific fertility rates at each stage of her reproductive life. In 2009, the TFR for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females was estimated to be 2.57 babies per woman, compared with 1.90 babies per woman for all Australian females.

Trust

The 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey collected information on the level of trust people have in other people and in selected community services. The terms 'most people' and 'trust' are based on the respondent's interpretation. A local area is the space close to a person's home, such as their neighbourhood, suburb or community. The first question aims to determine a person's level of trust in the general public, and whether they feel they can go about their business confidently, expecting that people will generally treat them fairly. The remaining questions are in relation to specific people or services.

People aged 15 years and over were asked how strongly they agreed or disagreed with the following statements:

  • most people can be trusted,
  • their doctor can be trusted,
  • hospitals (public and private) can be trusted to do the right thing by them,
  • police in their local area can be trusted to do the right thing by them,
  • police outside their local area can be trusted to do the right thing by them, and
  • the local school can be trusted to do the right thing by the children who attend.

The wording of response categories differed slightly between non-remote and remote areas, but responses were treated the same:
  • strongly agree,
  • agree,
  • neither agree nor disagree,
  • disagree, or
  • strongly disagree.


U

Unemployed

People aged 15 years and over who were not employed but were actively looking for work in the previous four weeks, and were available to start work in the previous week. See also 'Labour force status'.


V

Victim of physical or threatened violence

A person who had physical force or violence used against them, or threatened to be used against them, in the 12 months prior to the survey. Includes violence or threats made by persons known to the respondent.


W


X


Y


Z


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