4604.0 - Energy Account, Australia, 2014-15 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 23/02/2017   
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MONETARY ENERGY SUPPLY AND USE

OVERVIEW

Monetary supply-use tables are an aggregation of products defined in the SNA to represent the output of industries. The tables are drawn directly from National Accounts benchmark data, which is the data used in the compilation of Input-Output tables. The net physical tables and these monetary tables are compiled on a different basis and should not be directly combined for analytical purposes. The hybrid energy account in this publication is recommended as a coherent presentation of physical and monetary energy data.
  • Australia's total supply of energy products at basic prices was valued at $155 billion in 2014-15, which is 12% lower than its 2013-14 value ($176 billion).
  • Australia's demand for energy products in productive activities, as represented by total intermediate use of energy products, decreased by 18% ($20 billion) between 2013-14 and 2014-15. In comparison, household final consumption of energy products was valued at $46 billion, which is only about 3% ($2 billion) lower than the year prior.


MONETARY ENERGY SUPPLY

Figure 1.8 shows the monetary contribution of selected industries and imports to domestic energy supply in Australia.

Graph Image for Figure 1.8 - Monetary energy supply, by industry and imports, Australia, 2010-11 to 2014-15

Footnote(s): (a) Includes Gas, Water Supply and Waste Services.

Source(s): Energy Account, Australia



The mining industry produced 48% ($75 billion) of Australia's total supply of energy products at basic prices in 2014-15. Of this total, 54% ($40 billion) was attributed to the value of coal production while gas and oil contributed 30% ($23 billion) and 14% ($11 billion) respectively. The second highest industry contributor of energy value in 2014-15 was the manufacturing industry, with 17% ($26 billion) of Australia's total supply of energy products at basic prices.

Imports of energy products accounted for 21% ($33 billion) of Australia's total supply of energy products at basic prices in 2014-15. Approximately 37% ($12 billion) of the total value of these imports was oil products.


MONETARY ENERGY USE

Figure 1.9 shows the monetary contribution by industry and households to domestic energy use in Australia.

Graph Image for Figure 1.9 - Monetary energy use, by industry and households, Australia, 2010-11 to 2014-15

Footnote(s): (a) Includes Forestry and Fishing; (b) Includes Gas, Water Supply and Waste Services; (c) Includes Government use.

Source(s): Energy Account, Australia



Households accounted for more than a third ($46 billion) of Australia's total domestic energy use in 2014-15. More than half ($24 billion) of this use was expenditure on petrol products, while just over a third ($16 billion) was expenditure on electricity.

The manufacturing industry accounted for around one fifth ($27 billion) of Australia's total domestic energy use. Nearly half of this energy ($13 billion) was oil products, while electricity and gas respectively accounted for 21% ($6 billion) and 20% ($5 billion) of this total.

Figure 1.10 shows the monetary contribution of individual products to Australian energy exports.

Graph Image for Figure 1.10 - Monetary exports, by products, Australia, 2010-11 to 2014-15

Footnote(s): (a) Black and brown coal; (b) Natural, LPG and Industrial Gases including coal seam gas; (c) Crude oil including condensate; (d) Kerosene (including kerosene type jet fuel), automotive petrol, petrodiesel, and gas oil or fuels n.e.c.; (e) Electricity generated from fossil fuels, hydro-electricity and electricity generation n.e.c.

Source(s): Energy Account, Australia



In 2014-15, Australia's energy exports fell by 7% to $67 billion. Coal exports accounted for 57% ($38 billion) of this total, while gas and oil respectively accounted for 27% ($18 billion) and 13% ($9 billion) of Australia's energy exports.