4604.0 - Energy Account, Australia, 2015-16 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 23/02/2018   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product


MAIN FINDINGS

INTRODUCTION

The data contained in this publication are produced in accordance with the principles outlined in the System of Environmental Economic Accounting 2012 Central Framework (SEEA CF), using a supply-use framework. Further detail on supply and use frameworks is contained in the Explanatory Notes.

Data on physical supply and use of energy products are primarily derived from the Department of the Environment and Energy, Australian Energy Statistics - Energy Update 2017 (AES). The ABS uses the SEEA framework to transform the AES data onto a basis consistent with the System of National Accounts (SNA), enabling linkages between energy supply, energy use and monetary data from the Australian National Accounts.

This account presents information on energy flows in both gross and net terms. Net tables show how much energy is used, whereas gross table provide additional information on how energy is transformed and used within the economy.


TOTAL ECONOMY - NET

In net terms, Australia’s total energy supply increased by 5% to approximately 23,244 petajoules (PJ) in 2015-16.

In 2015-16 Australia's net energy supply was predominantly direct extraction from the environment with a smaller contribution from imports:
  • supply of natural inputs from the environment (21,111 PJ), and
  • imports (2,132 PJ).

On the use side, net energy use was predominantly exports:
  • net use by industry (2,720 PJ)
  • net use by households (1,299 PJ)
  • changes in inventories (-190 PJ)
  • exports (17,388 PJ), and
  • conversions and losses (2,026 PJ).


TOTAL ECONOMY - GROSS

In gross terms, Australia’s total energy supply increased by 6% to approximately 50,492 PJ in 2015-16

The SEEA CF gross presentation provides more detail on the flows of energy between the environment and the economy, including three components for supply:
  • supply of natural inputs from the environment (21,111 PJ),
  • supply of energy products by the economy (27,355 PJ), and
  • supply of residuals back to the environment (2,026 PJ)

On the use side, the SEEA CF gross presentation includes four components:
  • use of natural inputs by Australian industry and households (21,111 PJ),
  • use of energy products to produce (transform into) other energy products to be supplied back into the economy (6,138 PJ),
  • the end use of energy products by Australian industry (2,720 PJ less 190 PJ changes in inventories), households (1,299 PJ) and the rest of the world (17,388 PJ), and
  • flows of energy residuals back to the environment (2,026 PJ).


ENERGY SUPPLY - GROSS

In 2015-16, 21,111 PJ of energy was sourced from the Australian environment. This was a 5% increase (1,090 PJ) on the previous year's supply, with extraction of black coal (12,157 PJ), uranium (3,603 PJ) and natural gas (3,522 PJ) the largest contributors to this growth.

Australian industry transformed a large component of these natural inputs into other energy products, adding a further 25,223 PJ to the gross supply total. A further 2,132 PJ of energy was supplied to the economy via imports.

Figure 1.1 provides a breakdown of energy products produced in Australia
Graph Image for Figure 1.1 - Gross domestic production of energy products, by product, Australia, 2011-12 to 2015-16

Footnote(s): (a) 'Coal by-products' includes met coke, briquettes and other coal by-products; (b) 'Other refined products' includes petrol, diesel, aviation fuel, kerosene, heating oil, refinery fuel and naptha; (c) Renewables' includes biomass wood, bagasse, biofuels, hydro-electricity, solar and wind energy

Source(s): Energy Account, Australia



A total of 2,026 PJ of energy was supplied back to the environment as residuals – which includes losses of energy through transformation and distribution.


ENERGY USE - INDUSTRY - GROSS

In 2015-16, gross energy use by Australian industries increased by 6% to approximately 29,969 PJ.

The majority of this use was energy sourced from the Australian environment (21,111 PJ) and the remainder was energy products transformed or used up in the process of production (8,858 PJ). The main driver of growth in gross energy use by Australian industries was again extraction of black coal (12,157 PJ), uranium (3,603 PJ) and natural gas (3,522 PJ).

Energy products transformed in the process of production increased by 10% to approximately 6,138 PJ, while energy products used up in the process of production remained relatively steady at 2,720 PJ. The divergence between the two forms of use is largely caused by strong growth (34%) in the liquefication of natural gas prior to its export.


ENERGY USE - HOUSEHOLDS - GROSS

In 2015-16, gross energy use by Australian households increased by 1% (12 PJ) to approximately 1,299 PJ. The main driver of growth in household energy use was increased consumption of diesel (9%) and natural gas (2%). This growth has been somewhat offset by slight reduction in consumption of petrol (-1%) and LPG (-8%).

Figure 1.2 shows the contribution of selected industries, household, inventory changes and exports to the use of energy products in Australia.
Graph Image for Figure 1.2 - Transformation and end use of energy products, by industry and households, Australia, 2011-12 to 2015-16

Footnote(s): (a) Includes Forestry and fishing; (b) Includes Gas, water supply and waste services; (c) Includes government use.

Source(s): Energy Account, Australia