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2080.5 - Information Paper: Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset, Methodology and Quality Assessment, 2006-2011  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 18/12/2013  First Issue
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WEIGHTING THE ACLD


PURPOSE OF WEIGHTING
DESCRIPTION OF WEIGHTING PROCESS FOR LONGITUDINAL WEIGHTS
DESIGN WEIGHT
UNDER COVERAGE ADJUSTMENT
MISSED LINK ADJUSTMENT
CALIBRATION TO KNOWN POPULATION TOTALS

PURPOSE OF WEIGHTING

Weighting is the process of applying factors to a sample to infer results and calculate estimates for the population. To do this, a 'weight' is allocated to each enumerated person. This is a value which indicates how many population units are represented by the sample unit. The purpose of weights is to allow the data user to estimate the number of people in the population with particular characteristics, based on the sample.

The Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset (ACLD) is designed to measure change in Australian society over time, with the first two waves being from the 2006 and 2011 Census. For the first issue of the ACLD, a longitudinal weight has been developed which allows the weighted sample to represent all persons who were in scope of both the 2006 and 2011 Census. As shown in Figure 1, the population in scope or the longitudinal population is the overlap between the two Censuses (the shaded region). To estimate this population, the 2011 Estimated Resident Population (ERP) was reduced by the number of births and overseas arrivals that occurred since the 2006 Census. It could also have been estimated by reducing the 2006 population by the number of deaths and departing migrants between 2006 and 2011. However, as 2011 ERP is more recent, it was used as the starting point.

Cross-sectional estimates for the 2006 and 2011 populations can, and should, be extracted from 2006 or 2011 Census data rather than the ACLD.

Figure 1: IN SCOPE POPULATION FOR THE AUSTRALIAN CENSUS LONGITUDINAL DATASET, 2006-2011
In scope population for the ACLD, 2006-2011



DESCRIPTION OF WEIGHTING PROCESS FOR LONGITUDINAL WEIGHTS

Positive weights were calculated for each linked record on the ACLD, that is each 2006 sample record that was successfully linked to a 2011 Census record. No weights were calculated for the unlinked records. The resulting weights in the ACLD are a measure of how many population units each person represents, taking into account both the likelihood that the person was linked, and the general composition of the in scope population. The weights consist of four components. The first two components address the likelihood of a person being selected for the 2006 sample through a sample design and undercoverage adjustment. The third and fourth components adjust the weight on the basis of the longitudinal population in scope of both Censuses, by adjusting for missed links and benchmarking to the relevant population and subpopulations that were at risk of being underrepresented otherwise. The following describes each component in depth.
Design weight

For a sample survey, the design weight needs to take into account any differential likelihood of selection on the basis of survey design. Given that the 2006 sample of the ACLD was taken from a population Census and the design utilised random selection, the design weight for the ACLD is quite simply the inverse of the probability of selection. Given that the probability of selection is 1 in 20 (5%), the design weight is:

W1 = 20.
Under coverage adjustment

In order to represent the full 2006 Estimated Resident Population (ERP), the design weight was then adjusted for the small proportion of people who were in scope for the 2006 Census but did not complete a Census form in 2006. While this proportion varies substantially between demographic groups, the 2006 Census net undercount proportion of 2.7% was used for simplicity. This resulted in an undercoverage adjusted weight of:

W2 = W1 x (1 / (1-0.027))
= 20.555.
Missed link adjustment

The aim of this component was to account for missed links, that is, 2006 sample records that had corresponding 2011 Census records, but were not linked. No attempt was made to correct for false links. The missed link adjusted weight is the product of the undercoverage adjusted weight and the inverse of the estimated propensity to link.

W3 = W2 x (inverse of the estimated propensity to link)

The propensity to link was estimated using a logistic regression model that was applied to the 2006 sample, with the response variable being the link status. The logistic regression model describes a relationship between a 2006 sample record's propensity to link and its values for a range of 2006 Census variables such as Indigenous status, marital status, country of birth, language spoken at home and English proficiency, labour force participation and occupation, educational attainment, mobility (whether moved in the preceding year) and remoteness. The estimated propensity to link varied considerably between records.

Two separate models were applied to the 2006 sample. The first model was applied to people under the age of 15 years on 2006 Census night. This model excluded the variables that were not applicable to people under 15 years of age, such as marital status. The second model was applied to the remainder of the sample (persons aged 15 years or over in 2006).

Each model was initially estimated using a training dataset, which consisted of 75% of the respective records. For each model, an out of sample Hosmer-Lemeshow type of analysis was applied to the remaining 25% of the records to determine the estimated propensity ranges for which each model provided a poor fit. For the model applied to the sample that was aged under 15 years, the model significantly underestimated the linkage rates where the estimated propensities were less than 0.65. To improve the estimated propensities, all links for people aged under 15 years on 2006 Census night with estimated propensities less than 0.65 had their estimated propensities set to 0.65. Similarly, all links for people aged 15 years or over on 2006 Census night with estimated propensities less than 0.61 had their estimated propensities set to 0.61.

The missed link adjustment carries the assumptions that the ACLD contains no false links and that all records in the 2006 sample that weren't linked, did have a corresponding 2011 Census record. As with many linked datasets, both of these assumptions are invalid for the ACLD. The violation of these assumptions results in the missed link adjustment correcting not only for missed links, but also for the records in the 2006 sample that weren't linked because they didn't have a 2011 Census record. Therefore the missed link adjustment erroneously corrects also for persons that died between the 2006 and 2011 Census nights, persons that moved overseas between the 2006 and 2011 Census nights and (of less concern because it is an objective of the calibration component) persons that were living in Australia on 2011 Census night but weren't counted. Furthermore, records that are less likely to be linked are expected intuitively to be more likely to be linked incorrectly. Giving these links a higher missed link adjusted weight can increase the influence of false links in the ACLD. The calibration component remediates the over-representation of persons who have died or moved overseas to some extent.

Odds ratios and accompanying Wald confidence intervals for the predictor variables for the first model (for persons aged under 15 years in 2006) are contained in Table A.1. A comparison group is selected for each characteristic, and the odds ratio for the other categories represents the ratio of the odds of being linked in contrast to the comparison group. For instance, Table A.1 shows the odds ratios by age group in 2006. Those aged 8-13 years were less likely to be linked than those aged 0-7 years (the comparison group), but more likely than those aged 14 years. Conversely, the odds ratios for school type in 2006 show that persons attending Catholic schools were more likely to be linked than those attending government school (the comparison group).

Table A.1 - ODDS RATIOS FROM THE LOGISTIC REGRESSION MODEL, Persons aged under 15 years, 2006
95% CONFIDENCE LIMITS
Selected characteristics
Odds ratio
Low limit
Upper limit
no.

Age group
0-7 years (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
101 476
8-13 years
0.651
0.626
0.676
79 293
14 years
0.426
0.403
0.450
13 246
Country of Birth
Oceania and Antarctica (non-Indigenous persons) (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
172 907
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons
0.449
0.424
0.476
8 246
North-West Europe
0.531
0.481
0.586
2 600
Southern and Eastern Europe
0.587
0.465
0.743
495
North Africa and the Middle East
0.528
0.451
0.619
1 012
South-East Asia
0.620
0.538
0.715
1 436
North-East Asia
0.451
0.386
0.527
1 192
Southern and Central Asia
0.623
0.522
0.745
1 041
Americas
0.414
0.347
0.493
716
Sub-Saharan Africa
0.790
0.675
0.924
1 168
Missing(a)
0.575
0.523
0.632
3 189
Language
English (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
164 431
Other North European
0.617
0.514
0.741
790
Southern European
0.744
0.673
0.823
3 659
Eastern European
0.819
0.713
0.941
2 089
Southwest and Central Asian
0.945
0.843
1.058
4 805
Southern Asian
1.367
1.153
1.622
2 275
Southeast Asian
0.879
0.782
0.988
3 881
Eastern Asian
0.971
0.872
1.081
4 710
Australian Indigenous Languages
1.391
1.118
1.729
650
Other
0.466
0.410
0.531
1 477
Missing(a)
0.983
0.859
1.125
5 238
English Proficiency
Very Well (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
179 427
Well
0.849
0.775
0.929
4 981
Not Well
0.798
0.715
0.890
2 985
Not at All
0.765
0.671
0.871
2 330
Missing
0.852
0.738
0.983
4 294
Mobility
Same usual address one year ago (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
160 427
Different usual address one year ago
0.519
0.501
0.536
30 442
Missing
0.524
0.477
0.576
3 154
School sector
Government (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
78 096
Catholic
1.266
1.204
1.330
24 086
Other Non-Government
1.072
1.014
1.134
14 611
Missing/Other(b)
0.813
0.781
0.846
77 222
Remoteness
Major City (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
128 850
Inner Regional
0.840
0.809
0.871
40 240
Outer Regional
0.684
0.654
0.715
19 846
Remote
0.571
0.520
0.628
3 266
Very Remote
0.614
0.538
0.701
1 648
Other(c)
0.447
0.318
0.627
164

. . not applicable
(a) Includes Supplementary codes.
(b) Includes other school sector and pre-school
(c) Includes Migratory, Offshore and Shipping Zones and No usual address
Source: Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset 2006-2011



Odds ratios and accompanying Wald confidence intervals for the predictor variables for the second model (for persons aged 15 years or over in 2006) are contained in Table A.2. A wider variety of variables were available for this age group. There are some differences between the two models. For instance, English speaking proficiency appears to have a detrimental impact on the propensity to link for persons aged under 15 years, but no clear impact for those aged 15 years or over.

Table A.2 - ODDS RATIOS FROM LOGISTIC REGRESSION MODEL, Persons aged 15 years or over, 2006
95% CONFIDENCE LIMITS
Selected characteristics
Odds ratio
Low limit
Upper limit
no.

Country of Birth
Oceania and Antarctica (non-Indigenous persons) (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
557 076
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons
0.563
0.541
0.586
13 741
North-West Europe
0.75
0.734
0.766
67,836
Southern and Eastern Europe
0.837
0.806
0.869
36 573
North Africa and the Middle East
0.772
0.724
0.823
11 663
South-East Asia
0.730
0.695
0.767
26 628
North-East Asia
0.548
0.515
0.584
18 435
Southern and Central Asia
0.839
0.787
0.894
12 622
Americas
0.515
0.488
0.543
8 383
Sub-Saharan Africa
0.764
0.723
0.809
8 708
Missing
0.795
0.768
0.822
23 980
Language
English (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
640 446
Other Northern European
0.722
0.682
0.765
7 336
Southern European
0.916
0.885
0.948
35 926
Eastern European
0.796
0.760
0.835
17 496
Southwest and Central Asian
0.853
0.801
0.909
14 771
Southern Asian
0.875
0.806
0.950
10 266
Southeast Asian
0.901
0.849
0.956
17 267
Eastern Asian
0.820
0.773
0.870
24 864
Australian Indigenous Languages
1.871
1.638
2.137
1 401
Other
0.407
0.379
0.438
3 680
Missing
0.686
0.639
0.737
12 201
English Proficiency
Very Well (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
714 344
Well
1.057
1.024
1.091
38 298
Not Well
1.138
1.093
1.186
19 108
Not at All
0.932
0.862
1.007
3 278
Not stated
1.012
0.937
1.093
10 611
Mobility
Same usual address one year ago (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
642 109
Different usual address one year ago
0.520
0.512
0.527
129 782
Missing
0.577
0.552
0.603
13 742
Remoteness
Major City (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
540 431
Inner Regional
0.909
0.895
0.923
155 158
Outer Regional
0.798
0.782
0.814
72 549
Remote
0.639
0.609
0.669
10 721
Very Remote
0.536
0.501
0.572
4 902
Other(b)
0.094
0.084
0.105
1 894
Registered marital status
Married (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
393 344
Separated
0.468
0.454
0.483
24 208
Divorced
0.577
0.564
0.589
64 060
Widowed
0.379
0.370
0.387
46 980
Never Married
0.543
0.534
0.551
257 053
Highest year of school completed
Year 12 (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
347 382
Year 11
1.121
1.097
1.146
82 239
Year 10
1.191
1.171
1.212
187 565
Year 9 or below(a)
0.874
0.858
0.891
122 886
Not stated
0.628
0.610
0.647
45 562
Labour force status and Occupation
Not in the labour force (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
272 133
Unemployed
1.087
1.054
1.121
25 661
Employed
Professional
1.724
1.679
1.770
93 407
Manager
1.494
1.455
1.534
61 709
Technicians and trades
1.527
1.488
1.567
67 989
Community and personal service
1.430
1.390
1.471
41 932
Clerical and administrative
1.873
1.826
1.922
70 225
Sales workers
1.552
1.510
1.595
46 283
Machinery operators and drivers
1.367
1.324
1.410
31 422
Labourers
1.362
1.329
1.397
49 376
Employed, occupation not stated
1.091
1.032
1.153
7 922
Not stated
0.839
0.807
0.872
17 573
Level of non-school qualification
No post-school qualification (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
388 254
Postgraduate Degree
1.391
1.334
1.451
21 363
Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate
1.940
1.823
2.066
11 868
Bachelor Degree
1.807
1.763
1.853
94 628
Advanced Diploma and Diploma
1.584
1.542
1.626
58 854
Certificate
1.864
1.828
1.900
138 647
Level of non-school qualification not stated or inadequately described
0.925
0.904
0.947
72 033
Student status
Not studying or studying part time (comparison group)
1.000
. .
. .
685 704
Full time student
1.200
1.174
1.226
71 221
Not stated
0.812
0.786
0.839
28 716

. . not applicable
(a) Includes persons who did not go to school.
(b) Includes Migratory, Offshore and Shipping Zones and No usual address
Source: Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset, 2006-2011Calibration to known population totals

The missed link adjusted weight was calibrated so that the resulting weighted counts of the ACLD links would be equal to estimates of the longitudinal population size at the national and selected sub-national levels. For the ACLD, weights were calibrated to two sets of benchmarks simultaneously using a 'raking' tool. This is a program which was developed to determine record level weights using iterative horizontal and vertical passes through the unit records until a satisfactory set of weights are converged upon. To mitigate against the possibility of the tool producing calibrated weights that were less than one, lower bounds for the calibrated weights were set to 20% of the missed link adjusted weight. Upper bounds were not necessary because extremely high weights were not produced.

The first set of benchmarks comprise state/territory, by interstate migration, by sex, by ten year age group population benchmarks. There were two interstate migration groups, with the first group consisting of the population that resided in the given state/territory on 30 June 2006 and 30 June 2011, and the second group consisting of the population that resided in the given state/territory on 30 June 2011 but were in a different state/territory on 30 June 2006 (i.e. interstate arrivals). The interstate migration groups served to correct for the lower linkage rates among people who moved interstate between 30 June 2006 and 30 June 2011. The second set of benchmarks comprised Indigenous status (according to the 2011 Census) by state/territory.

Note that the ERP by Indigenous status for the period 2006 - 2011 is currently being revised in view of a higher than expected intercensal increase in the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons (see Census of Population and Housing: Understanding the Increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Counts, 2006-2011, ABS cat. no. 2077.0). As a result, weights for the ACLD will be reviewed when this data becomes available.

The first set of benchmarks were estimated by first dividing the 30 June 2011 ERP into the state/territory, by interstate migration, by sex, by ten year age groups and then subtracting the number of overseas arrivals between 30 June 2006 and 30 June 2011 from each of the groups. Births between 30 June 2006 and 30 June 2011 were automatically excluded because the youngest age group consisted of those aged 5-14 years on 30 June 2011. Groups that had very small ERPs were merged together. For example, the male ERP for those aged 75 to 84 years and those aged 85 years or over on 30 June 2011 who resided in the Northern Territory during the intercensal period were summed. As a result, the first set of benchmarks comprises 275 age by sex by state/territory groups. These benchmarks are displayed in Table A.3.


Table A.3: BENCHMARKS OF THE LONGITUDINAL POPULATION, By state/territory, interstate migration status, sex and age, 2006-2011
SAME STATE/TERRITORY 2006 AND 2011
INTERSTATE ARRIVALS
Age group (years)
Males
(no.)
Females
(no.)
Age Group (years)
Males
(no.)
Females
(no.)

NEW SOUTH WALES
5-14
400 217
377 186
5-14
27 114
25 824
15-24
375 838
358 689
15-24
32 410
33 108
25-34
298 798
303 881
25-34
58 229
56 585
35-44
399 107
419 910
35-44
36 421
34 076
45-54
436 653
451 411
45-54
20 721
19 089
55-64
383 051
386 488
55-64
16 116
16 039
65-74
260 573
267 604
65-74
8 796
8 030
75-84
148 054
184 237
75-84
3 232
3 315
85 or over
46 742
89 666
85 or over
957
2 111

VICTORIA
5-14
293 457
278 736
5-14
19 935
19 470
15-24
293 685
284 251
15-24
26 554
27 042
25-34
251 013
253 892
25-34
46 619
47 420
35-44
318 557
335 260
35-44
28 823
27 454
45-54
330 277
345 319
45-54
15 808
14 476
55-64
285 499
295 800
55-64
11 026
11 337
65-74
192 330
201 673
65-74
5 503
5 173
75-84
110 940
139 196
75-84
2 194
2 414
85 or over
34 859
66 440
85 or over
752
1 511

QUEENSLAND
5-14
242 570
230 766
5-14
33 372
31 600
15-24
230 975
223 291
15-24
38 001
39 376
25-34
175 661
181 449
25-34
58 638
54 444
35-44
235 954
248 810
35-44
41 256
38 129
45-54
253 252
265 598
45-54
25 371
23 461
55-64
226 449
227 398
55-64
18 067
17 434
65-74
152 418
152 725
65-74
8 928
7 643
75-84
77 295
92 815
75-84
3 079
3 377
85 or over
23 290
42 614
85 or over
1 007
2 204

SOUTH AUSTRALIA
5-14
83 980
80 417
5-14
7 552
7 167
15-24
90 740
85 131
15-24
8 565
9 117
25-34
75 882
72 981
25-34
13 782
13 171
35-44
90 517
90 871
35-44
9 435
9 215
45-54
102 486
105 325
45-54
6 312
5 911
55-64
92 646
96 117
55-64
4 773
4 512
65-74
62 766
67 417
65-74
2 279
1 882
75-84
37 710
47 404
75 or over
922
1 194
85 or over
12 584
24 669

WESTERN AUSTRALIA
5-14
119 638
115 820
5-14
11 813
11 326
15-24
125 121
120 334
15-24
13 894
13 257
25-34
97 067
99 008
25-34
33 410
24 585
35-44
125 149
128 262
35-44
17 519
14 944
45-54
136 019
140 324
45-54
10 267
8 637
55-64
119 256
120 800
55-64
6 145
5 169
65-74
74 713
75 856
65-74
2 102
1 702
75-84
39 089
48 564
75 or over
753
1 064
85 or over
11 514
22 013

TASMANIA
5-14
27 963
25 968
5-14
4 193
3 987
15-24
28 402
25 856
15-24
3 789
4 277
25-34
19 788
19 587
25-34
6 532
6 882
35-44
25 882
27 131
35-44
5 186
5 301
45-54
31 718
32 470
45-54
3 746
3 862
55-64
30 159
29 824
55-64
3 460
3 585
65-74
20 900
20 977
65-74
1 873
1 630
75-84
11 243
13 710
75 or over
638
804
85 or over
3 439
6 434

NORTHERN TERRITORY
5-14
11 523
10 716
5-14
4 955
4 684
15-24
9 123
7 858
15-24
8 072
7 126
25-34
2 011
4 557
25-34
14 309
11 643
35-44
8 451
9 768
35-44
6 823
5 832
45-54
9 968
10 064
45-54
4 362
3 863
55-64
8 592
7 310
55-64
2 836
2 403
65-74
4 147
3 367
65 or over
(a)1 801
75 or over
1 465
1 586

AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY
5-14
14 539
13 902
5-14
5 323
5 077
15-24
16 672
15 417
15-24
9 211
9 154
25-34
9 776
9 951
25-34
15 579
14 755
35-44
14 942
16 162
35-44
8 359
7 787
45-54
17 341
19 609
45-54
4 437
3 876
55-64
16 017
17 140
55-64
2 293
2 291
65-74
9 593
10 236
65-74
900
937
75-84
4 751
5 937
75 or over
637
1 111
85 or over
1 388
2 548

(a) Males and females were placed into a single group for this benchmark category
Source: adjusted 2011 Estimated Resident Population


After setting these benchmarks, the data was assessed for how well subpopulations were represented. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons were under-represented at this stage, partly owing to intercensal growth in this subpopulation (see Census of Population and Housing: Understanding the Increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Counts, 2006-2011, ABS cat. no. 2077.0). At the time of publication, finalised ERP data by Indigenous status for 2006 was unavailable - this data is due for release early in 2014. As a result, the second set of benchmarks was estimated by applying the rate of growth for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population from 2006-2011 from previous projections (Experimental Estimates and Projections, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, 1991 to 2021, ABS cat. no. 3238.0) to the 2011 ERP for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons (using the B series of projections) and removing deaths and interstate departures between 2006 and 2011. Overseas departures were not estimated or removed.

The Indigenous status benchmark groups comprised 17 state/territory by Indigenous status groups, where Indigenous status was either 'Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander' or 'Not Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander' (including both non-Indigenous and not stated). Due to the small population size in Other Territories, this benchmark was not disaggregated by Indigenous status. The benchmarks by Indigenous status are displayed in Table A.4.


Table A.4: BENCHMARKS OF THE LONGITUDINAL POPULATION, By state/territory and Indigenous status, 2011
State/Territory
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons
(no.)
Other persons(a)
(no.)

New South Wales
181 529
5 808 749
Victoria
41 805
4 582 890
Queensland
164 462
3 564 255
South Australia
33 001
1 392 431
Western Australia
78 036
1 817 098
Tasmania
21 078
440 118
Northern Territory
60 841
128 374
Australian Capital Territory
5 431
302 217

(a) Includes non-Indigenous persons and persons who did not state an Indigenous status in 2011.
Source: adjusted 2011 Estimated Resident Population



The mean weight for selected characteristics gives an indication of how much the weight has been increased or reduced from the initial probability of selection (which would give a weight of 20) in order to address missed links and Census undercount.

Table A.5 shows that the mean weight for the linked records is 23.3 - that is, each person in the linked dataset generally represents just over 23 persons in the population. The largest weight was 168 and the smallest was 4. The mean weight was higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons and for people who had moved, particularly interstate.



Table A.5: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS FOR WEIGHTS, By selected characteristics, 2011

no.
Minimum Weight
Maximum Weight
Mean Weight
Standard Deviation
Median Weight

Sex
Male
390 467
4.3
168.1
23.5
8.1
21.4
Female
410 293
4.3
129.8
23.0
7.3
20.9
Age group (years)
0-14
114 222
12.1
104.4
22.3
6.6
20.4
15-24
109 254
8.4
129.8
23.6
8.4
21.2
25-34
98 277
4.3
168.1
23.9
12.9
20.1
35-44
117 135
10.5
98.5
23.8
8.1
21.6
45-54
123 606
13.7
116.1
23.2
6.3
21.5
55-64
108 853
17.0
109.3
22.7
5.3
21.3
65-74
71 782
17.2
91.9
22.8
4.6
21.6
75-84
41 998
16.2
91.9
23.5
4.4
22.3
85 or over
15 630
15.9
118.4
25.6
5.5
25.5
Indigenous status
Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander
15 205
5.9
168.1
38.6
11.0
36.8
Other(a)
785 552
4.3
132.1
23.0
7.3
21.1
State/Territory (Usual Residence)
NSW
260 720
16.7
107.2
23.0
7.1
21.1
Vic.
203 623
17.0
118.4
22.7
6.5
21.0
Qld
156 438
16.3
106.3
23.8
8.2
21.3
SA
61 904
17.3
103.8
23.0
6.9
21.1
WA
78 373
17.5
114.8
24.2
8.5
21.8
Tas.
19 726
16.2
114.9
23.4
7.9
20.9
NT
6 213
4.3
168.1
30.5
23.6
19.5
ACT
13 705
11.1
88.0
22.4
11.8
18.4
Other Territories
62
27.5
91.1
45.7
19.3
39.4
Interstate arrivals
State/Territory (Usual Residence 2011)
NSW
6 654
34.4
107.2
60.4
11.5
59.5
Vic.
5 512
38.4
118.4
56.9
9.4
55.4
Qld
8 409
35.9
106.3
52.9
10.6
49.9
SA
1 871
40.4
103.8
56.6
10.2
53.5
WA
2 931
36.4
114.8
60.2
10.2
57.6
Tas.
1 255
29.2
114.9
47.5
13.7
42.7
NT
1 165
47.0
168.1
67.5
18.7
62.4
ACT
1 846
31.5
88.0
49.6
10.6
49.4
Other Territories
14
74.5
91.1
80.8
5.4
79.6
Moved last year
State/Territory (Usual Residence 2011)
NSW
26 476
12.8
132.1
25.9
12.9
21.4
Vic.
21 090
8.9
118.4
25.6
11.8
21.4
Qld
21 829
4.6
116.1
27.5
13.1
21.9
SA
6 130
5.1
101.5
27.0
12.3
22.2
WA
9 712
15.4
114.8
28.3
14.1
22.4
Tas.
2 215
16.2
104.7
27.9
13.6
22.2
NT
1 034
4.3
168.1
46.1
30.2
50.4
ACT
1 912
11.2
88.1
31.0
17.3
21.9
Other Territories
9
10.7
91.1
81.9
30.9
76.3
Total Persons
800 759
4.3
168.1
23.3
7.7
21.2

(a) Includes non-Indigenous persons and persons who did not state an Indigenous status in 2011.
Source: Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset 2006-2011

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