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1380.0.55.005 - Perspectives on Regional Australia: Population Turnover, 2006  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/09/2008  First Issue
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VICTORIA


AN ANALYSIS OF SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS OF MELBOURNE (C) - INNER - A HIGH POPULATION TURNOVER STATISTICAL LOCAL AREA

On this page:

Introduction

Melbourne (C) - Inner: Characteristics of the area and usual residents

People who arrived in, departed or did not move from Melbourne (C) - Inner


Introduction

In Victoria, the five Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) with the greatest population turnover were all in urban areas. This chapter presents some data for these five SLAs (see Table 3.1), then discusses the characteristics of one SLA as an example. In Victoria, Melbourne (C) - Inner was chosen as an example of an inner city area and had the highest population turnover (103.8%) of all SLAs in Victoria.

To view an image of this SLA via Google Maps Australia please click on the following link: Melbourne (C) - Inner.

TABLE 3.1. HIGH POPULATION TURNOVER SLAs - Victoria

2001 Census count(a)
2006 Census count
Census count change
Arrivals(b)
Departures(c)
Net migration(c)
Population flow(c)
Population turnover(c)
SLA(d)
psns
psns
psns
psns
psns
psns
psns
%

Melbourne (C) - Inner
7 065
11 591
4 526
7 195
1 969
5 226
9 164
103.8
Melbourne (C) - S'bank-D'lands
4 495
13 306
8 811
9 077
1 438
7 639
10 515
99.3
Melbourne (C) - Remainder
39 013
46 481
7 468
24 988
13 341
11 647
38 329
99.2
Port Phillip (C) - St Kilda
47 104
49 800
2 696
19 997
15 568
4 429
35 565
89.3
Yarra (C) - Richmond
23 476
24 585
1 109
9 860
8 346
1 514
18 206
88.2

(a) Based on 2006 Census boundaries
(b) Excludes people aged 0-4 years and those who did not state where they lived 5 years ago
(c) Excludes people aged 0-4 years, those who did not state where they lived 5 years ago, and overseas departures, meaning these data are estimated on a different basis than the 2006 Census count (for further information about how Population turnover is calculated, refer to Explanatory Note 14)
(d) Excludes unincorporated areas and SLAs with a population of less than 500 people
Source: Census of Population and Housing, 2006 and Census of Population and Housing, 2001
Note: This table is based on place of usual residence. Cells in this table have been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data.



Melbourne (C) - Inner: Characteristics of the area and usual residents

The Melbourne (C) - Inner SLA is situated in the heart of the central business district of Victoria's capital city, Melbourne. A number of universities are situated within and around Melbourne (C) - Inner, specifically the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University and campuses of Victoria University.

Housing and households

The 2006 Census data showed Melbourne (C) - Inner SLA contained a high proportion of rented dwellings (71.0% of occupied private dwellings) and the main (almost the only) type of dwelling was flats, units or apartments (97.8% of occupied private dwellings). The median rent for this SLA was $305 per week, relatively high compared with the $185 per week recorded for Victoria.

At the 2006 Census, Melbourne (C) - Inner SLA had almost double the proportion of lone person households compared to Australia (42.1% and 24.4% respectively) and a much higher proportion of group households (21.2% compared to 3.9% for Australia).

Age

The Melbourne (C) - Inner SLA had a high proportion of young people, with a median age of usual residents of 25 years, compared with 37 years for Australia. Almost one third (32.7%) of residents were attending University or other tertiary institutions compared with 4.1% of residents in Australia.

Employment

A high proportion (37.0%) of employed residents were recorded as Professionals (using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), 2006).

Ethnicity

Nearly 70% of the residents in Melbourne (C) - Inner were born overseas, compared with 23.9% of people living in Australia. A high proportion of Melbourne (C) - Inner residents were born in Maritime South East Asia (23.2%) and Chinese Asia (includes Mongolia) (15.9%), mainly in the countries Malaysia, Indonesia and China (excludes SARs and Taiwan Province).

Only 43.4% of usual residents in Melbourne (C) - Inner spoke only English at home, compared with 83.2% of people living in Australia.


People who arrived in, departed or did not move from Melbourne (C) - Inner

Following is a discussion of the characteristics of three populations relating to Melbourne (C) - Inner: arrivals to the SLA within the five years to the 2006 Census; departures from the SLA within the same time period; and those who did not move.

At the 2006 Census more than 80% of the usual residents of Melbourne (C) - Inner (excluding people aged 0-4 years and those who did not state where they lived five years ago) were new arrivals to the SLA (i.e. arrived within the last five years). Most of these arrivals (57.8%) were from overseas (refer Graph 3.1).

GRAPH 3.1. ARRIVALS (a), By place of origin - Melbourne (C) - Inner
Graph 3.1. Arrivals, By place of origin, Melbourne (C) - Inner


Most departures from Melbourne (C) Inner (81.7%) moved to other SLAs in Victoria (this analysis excludes departures overseas, which are unable to be counted using Census data).

Age

Most arrivals to Melbourne (C) - Inner (68.9% or 4,952 arrivals) were aged 15-29 years (see Graph 3.2) while for departures, the most common age group was 30-44 years (43.1% of departures), followed by 15-29 year olds (36.0%) (see Graph 3.3). Departures aged 5-14 years represented 2.6% of departures, which is a larger proportion than this age group represented in the general population of the SLA (1.0%).

GRAPH 3.2. ARRIVALS (a), By age group - Melbourne (C) - Inner
Graph 3.2. Arrivals, By age group, Melbourne (C) - Inner


GRAPH 3.3. DEPARTURES (a), By age group - Melbourne (C) - Inner
Graph 3.3. Departures, By age group, Melbourne (C) - Inner


Education

Overseas arrivals had a much higher proportion of people attending University or other tertiary institutions (49.2%) than arrivals from elsewhere in Victoria or from interstate (20.3% and 18.5% respectively). Conversely, more than half (51.6%) of the arrivals from elsewhere in Victoria and 49.9% from interstate had a Bachelor degree or higher. This compared with 35.0% of arrivals from overseas and 44.4% of people who did not move SLA (see Graph 3.4).

Almost 55% of departures aged 15 years and over had a Bachelor degree or higher (54.5%). This is consistent with students leaving the SLA to work in their chosen careers once they have completed tertiary studies.

GRAPH 3.4. BACHELOR DEGREE OR HIGHER, Melbourne (C) - Inner
Graph 3.4. Bachelor degree or higher, Melbourne (C) - Inner


Employment

Of those arrivals aged 15 years and over, 62.8% were in the labour force. More than 80% of arrivals from interstate and intrastate were in the labour force. Lower proportions were recorded for both overseas arrivals and people who did not move SLA (47.4% and 67.3% respectively). More than 85% of arrivals in the labour force were employed. The majority of arrivals who were employed were full-time (68.5%), with 26.7% working part-time.

More than half (52.2%) of employed arrivals were recorded (using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), 2006) as being Managers or Professionals. Professional occupations were held by 37.8% of employed arrivals.

Of departures aged 15 years and over, 83.5% were in the labour force and the majority of employed departures were working full-time (74.3%). More than 60% of employed departures, were Managers or Professionals (62.3%), with 42.0% of employed departures with Professional occupations.

Income

With such high proportions in the labour force, working full-time and being employed in Managerial or Professional occupations, it is perhaps not surprising that more than one third (38.4%) of departures aged 15 years and over earned $1,000 or more per week and 14.3% earned $2,000 or more per week.

There is a stark comparison of these proportions with those for arrivals in the same age group; 22.6% earned $1,000 or more per week and 5.6% earned $2,000 or more per week. At the other end of the income scale, one quarter of arrivals aged 15 years and over recorded nil income.

Please note: All data presented in this publication relate to person or dwelling characteristics at the time of the 2006 Census. As arrivals and departures may have moved at any time in the five years to the 2006 Census their characteristics could have been different at the time of their migration. The data presented also only captures a person's place of usual residence at the 2006 Census and five years prior to the Census. People could have moved residence numerous times between these time periods. Arrivals estimates exclude people who did not state where they lived five years ago, and those who were under the age of 5 at the time of the 2006 Census. In addition to those exclusions, estimates of departures also exclude overseas departures (as these people were not enumerated in the Census). To be consistent with the conceptual basis of the arrivals and departures estimates, the adjusted Census count used in calculating population turnover also excludes 0-4 year olds and people who did not state where they lived five years ago.


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