Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Release Date
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
4102.0 - Australian Social Trends, 2004  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 15/06/2004   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product  
Contents >> Work

Work


    NATIONAL AND STATE SUMMARY TABLES

    WORK DATA SOURCES AND DEFINITIONS


    YOUNG PEOPLE IN EMPLOYMENT

    While the proportion of young people aged 15-24 years who were employed increased between 1983 and 2003, this was mainly attributable to a rise in part-time employment among this age group - from 18% to 47% of employed young people over the period. This article examines labour force experiences for young people, such as the combination of work with study. It also considers some of the differences between young people aged 15-19 years, and those aged 20-24 years.


    MATURE AGE WORKERS

    In the 20 years to 2003, the proportion of people in the labour force who were aged 45 to 64 years increased from 24% to 32%. This article examines changes in labour force participation of persons aged 45 to 64 years over time. It discusses the characteristics of mature age workers, and their employment across industries and occupations.


    ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES IN THE LABOUR FORCE

    In the 2001 census, the unemployment rate was 20% for Indigenous peoples, compared with 7% for the non-Indigenous population. This article discusses trends in the level of labour force participation and the unemployment rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples aged 15-64 years. It also examines the characteristics of employed Indigenous persons, including their sector of employment and distribution across Remoteness Areas.


    COMMUNITY SERVICE WORKERS

    Between 1996 and 2001, there was a decrease in the number of people employed in community service industries providing care in institutional settings while the number of people employed in home-based care increased. This article examines the labour force characteristics of community service industries, qualifications held by people employed in these industries and the contribution made by volunteer workers.



This section contains the following subsection :
      National and state summary tables
      Work data sources and definitions
      Young people in employment
      Mature age workers
      Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the labour force
      Community service workers

Previous PageNext Page

Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window


Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.