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6106.0 - Labour Statistics News, Feb 2010  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 25/02/2010   
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Contents >> AST Articles

This document was added 03/03/2010.



Australian Social Trends Articles

Trends in Household Work

'In 2006, women spent almost twice as much time on household work as men did. The opposite was true of paid work.'

Read more to know whether people are doing more or less housework than in the past, the division of housework between men and women and how this has changed over time.

This article was first published in the March 2009 issue of Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).


Retirement and Retirement Intentions

'Over one million people plan to retire in the next ten years.'

This article looks at why people have retired (or intend to retire), sources of income after retirement, retirement intentions by industry of employment and whether people plan to wind down to retirement (e.g. whether they plan to move from full-time work to part-time work prior to retirement).

This article was first published in the March 2009 issue of Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).


Casual Employees

'In 2007, there was 2.1 million casuals and they were less likely to have flexible working arrangements than employees with paid leave entitlements.'

This article focuses on the flexibility of working arrangements of casual employees (using the ABS proxy of employees without leave entitlements), and also briefly examines job stability for casuals.

This article was first published in the June 2009 issue of Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).


Carers and Employment

'In 2007, around two-thirds of female carers who were working full-time always or often felt rushed or pressed for time.'

This article covers the labour force status of carers, why carers were outside the labour force, the proportions of carers who always or often feel pressed for time and retirement intentions and superannuation for carers.

This article was first published in the September 2009 issue of Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).


People With More Than One Job

'Multiple job holders are much more likely to work at night and on weekends than single job holders.'

Read more to know how many people work more than one job, their characteristics, what sort of work they're doing (employment type, occupation, industry), how much they earn, weekly hours worked, travel time, how many days a week they usually work, whether they feel pressed for time, how long they've had their second job and whether they're happy with their working pattern.

This article was first published in the September 2009 issue of Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).


Work, Life and Family Balance

'There are over one and a half million two-parent families with children in Australia, with most of these families having both parents working. In the majority (80%) of these working families, at least one of the parents said they were often or always pressed for time.'

This article covers parents' working arrangements (e.g. do they work from home, do they work at night), whether they have access to paid leave and flexible working conditions and use of child care. It also covers how parents spend their time and why parents feel pressured for time.

This article was first published in the September 2009 issue of Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).


Jobless Families

'There are over half a million children who lived in a family where no-one has a job. However, there are fewer jobless families now than there were ten years ago.'

Discusses jobless families (with children under 15 years of age), looking at the circumstances and socioeconomic characteristics of these families.

This article was first published in the December 2009 issue of Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).


Patterns in Work

'In 2007, 41% of Australia's workers preferred to work some or all of their hours at night or on the weekend. An even larger proportion (51%) usually worked some or all of their hours at these 'non-traditional' times.'

Looks at the working patterns of Australians, particularly those people who may be working outside of the traditional business hours or working on a weekend.

This article was first published in the December 2009 issue of Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).


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